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Time Machine

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ashort:
http://www.macworld.com/article/132118/2008/02/timemachine1.html?lsrc=mwweek

MacWorld has a list of "things Time Machine won't do".  I'm curious as to how much of what is so bad about Time Machine are real issues?  You have to approach Time Machine as a software with a specific purpose.  Jobs himself at two different keynotes did this.  He did not promise the world and come up short.  He said "here's a neat tool that those of you who - shame on you - don't backup can use to give your data some security, and it's SO easy to use...watch this."  Time Machine is aimed at a large population of users who do NOT backup their systems regularly.  In filling that gap, I think it is a fantastic product.  I just wish my wheel mouse would flow through the snapshots while I am in it.  That would be extra special cool.

What Time Machine canít do for you

Doesnít Make Bootable Duplicates[/B]
 I don't know how important this is.  If I am recovering a system, wouldn't I want to completely refresh at least the bootable and system portion?  How many home backup solutions (which Time Machine absolutely IS) provide you with an easy to restore bootable archive?

Doesnít Give You Much Control
 It backups so often, it's easy and free with OS-X.  Who cares?  And there are hacks for those who don't like the schedule.

Doesnít Use Optical Discs
 Some really nice things about optical disks:
[*]they decay over time
[*]they would require that you label and swap out every few days.
[*]they do NOT work well with Time Machine's easy restore mechanism.
[/list]
 Huh...I wonder why Time Machine doesn't support optical media.

Simple Controls: The Time Machine preference pane has just a handful of controls, including a cartoonishly large on/off slider.
  Didn't he hear jobs talking Time Machine up?  Simplicity is exactly what Time Machine was supposed to be!

Doesnít Use AirPort Disks
 This will be baked in soon if it hasn't already, and I am using (have been since day 1) a very simple but very effective hack to use a FreeNAS afp server for my Time Machine backups.

Doesnít Compress Files
 Disk space is so stinking cheap, and the way Time Machine works with multiple links to the same file on the same drive fro files that never change or seldom do.  That saves a lot of space already.  And, I store most of my data on mirrored storage on the same FreeNAS box mentioned above.  It's already backed up (RAID mirror) so I don't worry about it.  I am using only 45GB of my iMac's drive because I offload pictures and music and podcasts and application specific backups to the FreeNAS box.

Doesnít Use Encryption
  Again: Simplicity!!!  You want encryption?  Encrypt the drive that Time Machine writes to.  Done.  Now it has to mount that drive automatically so you'll have to cache the password somewhere and that defeats the purpose.

Doesnít Work Well with FileVault
  Should it?

Doesnít Include Off-Site Protection
  SIMPLICITY!!!  If Time Machine works for you, you aren't too worried about offsite storage.  And again...I don't know how Time Machine would work with offline media anyway (see optical)

false sense of security. After all, someone who breaks into your office and steals your Mac will probably pick up the hard drive sitting next to it, too.
 Yep, all true.

Just feels to me like they are slamming Time Machine for being everything that Apple intended it to be, and nothing else.

IBI:
I think it's a combination of two things:

1. This is OS X's built in backup app, and programs that come with the OS should be useful to the majority of it's users. As time machine isn't too useful for quite a few users there's probably something of a feeling that it's wasted disk space/money.

2. It should be made easy for people to follow proper backup procedure and more difficult to do anything less, maybe it's seen that apple are wrongly encouraging people to not bother making proper backups?

There are just possible reasons, I haven't seen time machine working yet so I've got no personal opinion on it.

iMav:
I think Time Machine is great.  (and with the latest software update, network disks work just fine, BTW)  

"Proper backups" are simply what allows you to restore what you NEED if/when your computer fails (hdd, or otherwise).  Personally, I would never restore a full system image from backup.  I'd see it as an opportunity for a nice, fresh install.  Lay down the OS, patch, reinstall your apps, and restore your data.  

And lets not forget that in the "real world", backups are primarily relied on for accidental deletions of data.  A scenario that Time Machine excels at.

IMHO, TM is excellent for the average Mac user.  For those a bit more demanding that require more, there are tons of software packages available.  And, for those that are a bit more tech-savvy, there are tons of tools available with OS X to help you back up your data however you please (rsync, dd, tar, etc).  ;)

Nonmouse:

--- Quote from: ashort;3117 ---http://www.macworld.com/article/132118/2008/02/timemachine1.html?lsrc=mwweek


Doesnít Use Optical Discs
 Some really nice things about optical disks:
[*]they decay over time
[*]they would require that you label and swap out every few days.
[*]they do NOT work well with Time Machine's easy restore mechanism.
[/list]
 Huh...I wonder why Time Machine doesn't support optical media.

--- End quote ---


Is there a "don't" missing from the line I bolded?  o.O

ashort:

--- Quote from: Nonmouse;3142 ---Is there a "don't" missing from the line I bolded?  o.O
--- End quote ---


Nope.  Bit loss due to age is a real problem with CD and DVD media.  I don't think it is worse that tape media, but it is still there.

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