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A symmetric stagger, ergo design

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Gorbon:
I got a few Choc v2 switches and an inexpensive DSA set for testing, and thought I'd post an update in case anyone else is considering such a keycap/switch combo.



The switches fit fine (with a little room to spare) and actuate fully with no issues. The keycap side-wall thickness is ~1.3mm 0.1. I think that even slightly thicker DSA keycaps would probably work with these.



The only issue is that when fully depressed, the keycaps extend past the point where the 1.65mm plate would be, by about ~0.6mm. So they'll hit the plate, reducing their travel to ~2.6mm (from 3.2mm).



One solution I'd like to try, is to lift the switch with a 0.7mm thick o-ring and use a thinner 1mm plate. That would allow the switch to actuate fully and has the added benefit of cushioning the bottom-out (it'll be the ultimate gasket mount really).



I also did a few updates to the layout. I find that a uniform profile keyset would work well here (better space utilization, more flexibility), especially for the flat keyboard (0˚ slope) that this will be. The unconventional arrow key arrangement, aligns very well with the fingers of a hand at an angle and a straight wrist. A conventional inverted-T layout, would require outward twisting of the wrist (ulnar deviation) or shifting of the body/keyboard to one side.



Finally, using CAD (Cardboard Aided Design), I made a rough mock-up with a few keys and they seem to align very well with my fingers, which is encouraging.

nevin:

--- Quote ---Finally, using CAD (Cardboard Aided Design)
--- End quote ---

LOL!  :p  love it! too funny.

i've always preferred plateless, this would also eliminate the bottom out issues.
... but it you're handwiring... you need a plate....

i have yet to try the choc style switches.
....currently using pretty light, dampened tactiles.

Gorbon:

--- Quote from: nevin on Wed, 28 July 2021, 14:51:22 ---i've always preferred plateless, this would also eliminate the bottom out issues.
... but it you're handwiring... you need a plate....

--- End quote ---
Well, there are large gaps between the keys which would leave a PCB exposed. I think it'd be better to cover/protect it with a plate. It would also help with rigidity and switch alignment. I think I'll give the o-ring solution a go, I haven't seen anyone else do it. It'll be fun.


--- Quote from: nevin on Wed, 28 July 2021, 14:51:22 ---i have yet to try the choc style switches.
....currently using pretty light, dampened tactiles.

--- End quote ---
I've been exclusively using MX browns for many years now and I've found these Choc V2 linears light, smooth (they seem to come lubed from the factory) and with very little wobble.

nevin:
yeah, i'm a browns fan from way back. much prefer cherry over the gateron clear tops though.

if doing plateless, either do a high profile case to hide the gaps or just go with the "floating cap" look....
... with 3 pins on the switch, alignment shouldn't be an issue. only time i've had alignment issues is with alps (2 pins & wide switch pads/footprint) or plate mount mx switches and same alps/mx switch footprints.
.. i have a set of ergodash pcbs that are literally just the pcb's with bumpon feet on the underside of the pcb.... been working fine for better part of a year, but yes, not optimal for long term. (i just wanted to try the layout & thumb clusters, figured out that configuration wasn't for me. but it's a decent test bed.)

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