Author Topic: Information about cherry model numbers  (Read 4447 times)

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Offline IBI

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Information about cherry model numbers
« on: Thu, 06 March 2008, 12:32:18 »
Linky

It doesn't include information about which type of mechanical switch the mechanical ones have (cherry say they offer 3 different versions) but an interesting read anyway.

p.s. Sorry if this has been posted before, the search didn't give me any sensible results.
Owned: Raptor-Gaming K1 (linear MX)(Broken), IBM Model M UK, Dell AT102W, Left-handed keyboard with Type 1 Simplified Alps.

Offline Ulysses31

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Information about cherry model numbers
« Reply #1 on: Thu, 06 March 2008, 20:04:34 »
Interesting.  I take it from the description that the FTSC-type switch is similar to the old buckling-spring switches used in early keyboards?  I read somewhere that the IBM Model-M used a mechanism to strike a membrane and provide a tactile sensation, and that to call them truly mechanical keyboards was a common misconception.  It might have been Wikipedia :|.

EDIT: OK I could be wrong, but I swear I saw that description of Model-Ms somewhere on the net; I wish i'd bookmarked it now >_<.  Oh, here it is:
http://groups.google.ad/group/alt.comp.hardware/msg/d68871aab863481a

Information about cherry model numbers
« Reply #2 on: Thu, 06 March 2008, 21:13:03 »
Quote from: Ulysses31;3479
Interesting.  I take it from the description that the FTSC-type switch is similar to the old buckling-spring switches used in early keyboards?  I read somewhere that the IBM Model-M used a mechanism to strike a membrane and provide a tactile sensation, and that to call them truly mechanical keyboards was a common misconception.  It might have been Wikipedia :|.

EDIT: OK I could be wrong, but I swear I saw that description of Model-Ms somewhere on the net; I wish i'd bookmarked it now >_<.  Oh, here it is:
http://groups.google.ad/group/alt.comp.hardware/msg/d68871aab863481a


They are completely different. On the Cherry the spring is simply compressed vertically.  The buckling spring, OTOH, compresses vertically and then at a "catastrophic point" collapses sideways, which gives it that strong tactile feel.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Image:IBMbuckling.jpg

Offline Ulysses31

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Information about cherry model numbers
« Reply #3 on: Fri, 07 March 2008, 07:30:26 »
Oh well.  Misinformation from Google >_<.

Offline IBI

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Information about cherry model numbers
« Reply #4 on: Fri, 07 March 2008, 09:12:40 »
Quote from: Ulysses31;3479
Interesting.  I take it from the description that the FTSC-type switch is similar to the old buckling-spring switches used in early keyboards?


I think it's more like the keyboard pictured in my avatar. Here's a Picture from google image search.

Basically the keycaps are just the tops and the stems, that normal keycaps have to reach the domes, stay in the board. Apart from that I don't think it's any different from a normal rubber dome keyboard though. Although this is just a guess so if someone knows better go ahead and correct me.

Whether the model M is mechanical depends on how you're classifying.  As it shares many characteristics ('clickiness', feel, longevity, spring use) with the alpls/cherries/strongman switches you could call it mechanical, it's easiest just to call it buckling spring and leave it at that though.
Owned: Raptor-Gaming K1 (linear MX)(Broken), IBM Model M UK, Dell AT102W, Left-handed keyboard with Type 1 Simplified Alps.

Offline bhtooefr

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Information about cherry model numbers
« Reply #5 on: Fri, 07 March 2008, 10:17:27 »
Ah, but buckling spring doesn't tell the whole story - the Model F and the AT keyboards use capacitive switches underneath the buckling spring assemblies, instead of a membrane.

And, there are rubber dome Model Ms, too...

Offline IBI

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Information about cherry model numbers
« Reply #6 on: Fri, 07 March 2008, 10:47:23 »
Quote from: bhtooefr;3483
Ah, but buckling spring doesn't tell the whole story - the Model F and the AT keyboards use capacitive switches underneath the buckling spring assemblies, instead of a membrane.


How much difference does the difference make to the feel of the keys?

When I said 'call the model M buckling spring' I did only mean the buckling spring model M and derivatives. Refering to the rubber dome model Ms as buckling spring would just be silly :rolleyes:
Owned: Raptor-Gaming K1 (linear MX)(Broken), IBM Model M UK, Dell AT102W, Left-handed keyboard with Type 1 Simplified Alps.

Offline bhtooefr

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Information about cherry model numbers
« Reply #7 on: Fri, 07 March 2008, 12:09:34 »
I've actually heard that it makes the keyboard feel *MUCH* more solid. (I've also heard that it makes it MUCH louder. :D)

Offline pex

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Information about cherry model numbers
« Reply #8 on: Sun, 09 March 2008, 00:40:05 »
Another geekhack thread that you may benefit from:
http://geekhack.org/showthread.php?t=199
ЖCherry G80-8113 (someday I hope to have one that reads magstripes, rfid cards, and smartcards), broken \'98 42H1292 Model M, some other Model M from a decade before that, 30 more keyboards in a box, 4 more lying here or there
Destroying Sanctity: my Model M project. Status: Dead.