Author Topic: Is the Gateway Anykey G9900 Maxi Switch ps/2 NKRO?  (Read 1319 times)

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Offline Stumble

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Is the Gateway Anykey G9900 Maxi Switch ps/2 NKRO?
« on: Mon, 05 April 2021, 18:48:13 »
Hi,

I was thinking about buying a PCI-E PS/2 port to put in my computer but I don't want to buy the expansion if the keyboard isn't compatible with stenotyping. I was just wondering if anyone knew what type of key roll over the Gateway Anykey 9900 Maxi Switch has?

Model: Gateway G9900
FCCID: GYUR61SK
P/N: 7001024
S/N: D166204
Date MFG: 000108
« Last Edit: Mon, 05 April 2021, 19:23:46 by Stumble »

Offline Findecanor

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Re: Is the Gateway Anykey G9900 Maxi Switch ps/2 NKRO?
« Reply #1 on: Mon, 05 April 2021, 19:24:07 »
Rubber-dome keyboards made by Silitek most likely do not have NKRO.

I suppose you found this on eBay. In that case, the seller should be reported for keyword spamming, as the G9900 is not an Anykey model.
Man must shape his tools lest they shape him
-- Arthur Miller

Offline Stumble

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Re: Is the Gateway Anykey G9900 Maxi Switch ps/2 NKRO?
« Reply #2 on: Mon, 05 April 2021, 19:31:40 »
Hi,
Sorry my mistake I thought it was an anykey. I bought it a few years back at a yard sale and was wondering if it was nkro but yea since it has rubber dome keys it most likely does not have nkro. Do you know any keyboards with true nkro and like maybe 22 keys pressed or more at once?
« Last Edit: Mon, 05 April 2021, 19:42:34 by Stumble »

Offline Findecanor

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Re: Is the Gateway Anykey G9900 Maxi Switch ps/2 NKRO?
« Reply #3 on: Mon, 05 April 2021, 20:22:22 »
It should say AnyKey somewhere on it if it is. ;)

It is almost only mechanical keyboards that do have NKRO.
First, it needs to have either diodes, or capacitive sensing, for all keys to be registered by the on-board microcontroller. Not all vintage mechanical keyboards do, but almost all modern mechanical do.
Then it needs to have either PS/2 or - a USB interface made for it.
Most modern mass-produced mechanical keyboards have only 6-key rollover (6KRO), being limited by using a simple USB interface.
Almost all custom DIY mechanical keyboards with TMK or QMK firmware do support full NKRO over USB, however.

NKRO (N-key rollover) means that all keys can be registered at once. N = the number of keys on the keyboard.
6KRO means that all combinations of 6 keys are guaranteed to work, i.e. there is at least one combination of 6+1 keys that doesn't work. That doesn't mean that there can't be some combinations of 6+1 that do work.
Most membrane keyboards are only 2KRO, but similarly support some combinations of more keys than just two.
(There are some manufacturers that claim 10KRO, 14KRO or even NKRO but which do not follow this definition above and therefore mislead customers ... Razer for instance)

BTW. PS/2 isn't actually that fast. That is a myth. Pretty much all PS/2 keyboards are slower than a modern gaming or custom keyboard with USB.
Man must shape his tools lest they shape him
-- Arthur Miller