Author Topic: IBM Model M SSK  (Read 1245 times)

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Offline 2-bit Joe

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IBM Model M SSK
« on: Tue, 11 January 2022, 17:22:15 »
A fairly grimy IBM Model M SSK up for auction at shopgoodwill.  https://shopgoodwill.com/item/137099440

Offline DubbTom

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Re: IBM Model M SSK
« Reply #1 on: Tue, 11 January 2022, 17:44:37 »
Grimy indeed. It's also missing the original F12 key. Don't think I'd pay much more than the current bid given its condition but a good find nonetheless  :thumb:
poker II

Offline 2-bit Joe

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Re: IBM Model M SSK
« Reply #2 on: Mon, 17 January 2022, 07:13:37 »
The one I linked to sold for $341.  A similar SSK, that I didn't link to, sold around the same time for $275.

These vintage SSKs are nice, but I'd just as soon get a new Unicomp Mini M for $121.

Offline fohat.digs

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Re: IBM Model M SSK
« Reply #3 on: Mon, 17 January 2022, 17:06:38 »
Releases of modern "updated" versions of classic keyboards usually don't drive prices for originals down, as might have been expected.
The radical right has been going through a period of post-Jan 6 retrenchment and reorganization that has the surface appearance of a decline: A recent study of political violence in the U.S. finds that it declined sharply, numerically speaking, in 2021.But just as the decline in the total numbers of hate groups over the same period disguised a shift on the ground in which fewer people signaled their radicalization with membership in hate groups, while certain groups also significantly increased in recruitment and in violent activity, the researchers at the Armed Conflict Location & Event Data Project (ACLED) who compiled the data warn that the underlying conditions around the decline indicate it is far more likely to be a period of calm before the storm.
“While the total number of political violence events in the United States declined in 2021 after far-right groups stormed the Capitol at the start of the year, trends since then reflect an ongoing evolution in anti-democratic mobilization on the right,” the report warns. “Many of the same far-right groups and networks involved in the Capitol attack have adapted their activity to fit the new environment."