Author Topic: Resin types  (Read 2454 times)

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Offline kolec94

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Resin types
« on: Fri, 04 August 2017, 13:14:47 »
What resin type do you use for keycaps?

Their are just so many resins and sku's of those resin types I can't decide which to get.
I don't have a vacuum chamber or pressure pot to low velocity would be best I think.

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Offline kolec94

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Re: Resin types
« Reply #1 on: Sat, 05 August 2017, 15:24:01 »
I'm thinking easy cast clear

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Offline klaushouse

  • Posts: 36
Re: Resin types
« Reply #2 on: Mon, 07 August 2017, 13:55:40 »
I have nothing useful to add, as I am one step earlier than you and still just playing around sculpting my keys, but I just wanted to let you know I was watching this thread curiously so if you want to post your findings on how w/e you decide to go with works, I'd love to know! Good luck!

Offline KeLorean

  • Posts: 167
  • Location: Space Coast, FL
Re: Resin types
« Reply #3 on: Fri, 11 August 2017, 16:52:34 »
there are basically three types of resin: polyester, epoxy, and polyurethane/urethane.  almost everybody in this community is using urethane bc it gives amazing results such as the clarity and shine BUT that comes at a price which is how temperamental it is, namely to moisture/humidity.  plus, it has a very short pot life. i dont know of any that you can work with more than 20minutes. epoxy resin does not react this way to humidity and some epoxy can sit around for over 24hrs and still remain pourable, but you cant polish it in the same way you can urethanes. polyester is typically the most inexpensive. it cures with a very hard finish and can be buffed to a shine. on the other hand it will yellow over time (unless it never sees any sunlight.) now, in my opinion this stuff is nasty as heck. when i go to the resin shop that sells this stuff i feel like my throat swells up. epoxy has less "harmful" vapors (honestly all of this stuff is harmful BUT some are more harmful than others) and urethane the least vaporous. and i wouldnt touch any of it when it is wet. this should serve as a guideline. do more research and talk to manufacturers to find whats right for u. cheers


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Offline KeLorean

  • Posts: 167
  • Location: Space Coast, FL
Re: Resin types
« Reply #4 on: Fri, 11 August 2017, 16:57:03 »
there are basically three types of resin: polyester, epoxy, and polyurethane/urethane.  almost everybody in this community is using urethane bc it gives amazing results such as the clarity and shine BUT that comes at a price which is how temperamental it is, namely to moisture/humidity.  plus, it has a very short pot life. i dont know of any that you can work with more than 20minutes. epoxy resin does not react this way to humidity and some epoxy can sit around for over 24hrs and still remain pourable, but you cant polish it in the same way you can urethanes. polyester is typically the most inexpensive. it cures with a very hard finish and can be buffed to a shine. on the other hand it will yellow over time (unless it never sees any sunlight.) now, in my opinion this stuff is nasty as heck. when i go to the resin shop that sells this stuff i feel like my throat swells up. epoxy has less "harmful" vapors (honestly all of this stuff is harmful BUT some are more harmful than others) and urethane the least vaporous. and i wouldnt touch any of it when it is wet. this should serve as a guideline. do more research and talk to manufacturers to find whats right for u. cheers


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i should stress that epoxy and urethane does put off harmful vapors. however urethane is the only resin some people, whom i consider foolish, will not use a respirator


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Offline klaushouse

  • Posts: 36
Re: Resin types
« Reply #5 on: Fri, 11 August 2017, 16:59:23 »
there are basically three types of resin: polyester, epoxy, and polyurethane/urethane.  almost everybody in this community is using urethane bc it gives amazing results such as the clarity and shine BUT that comes at a price which is how temperamental it is, namely to moisture/humidity.  plus, it has a very short pot life. i dont know of any that you can work with more than 20minutes. epoxy resin does not react this way to humidity and some epoxy can sit around for over 24hrs and still remain pourable, but you cant polish it in the same way you can urethanes. polyester is typically the most inexpensive. it cures with a very hard finish and can be buffed to a shine. on the other hand it will yellow over time (unless it never sees any sunlight.) now, in my opinion this stuff is nasty as heck. when i go to the resin shop that sells this stuff i feel like my throat swells up. epoxy has less "harmful" vapors (honestly all of this stuff is harmful BUT some are more harmful than others) and urethane the least vaporous. and i wouldnt touch any of it when it is wet. this should serve as a guideline. do more research and talk to manufacturers to find whats right for u. cheers


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Awesome reply, thanks so much! I recently bought some Smooth Cast 326. It doesn't tell me what type of resin it is but looking forward to tweaking and seeing what works/doesn't!

Are there actually serious negative effects to not using a respirator with urethane?

Offline KeLorean

  • Posts: 167
  • Location: Space Coast, FL
Re: Resin types
« Reply #6 on: Fri, 11 August 2017, 17:06:25 »
there are basically three types of resin: polyester, epoxy, and polyurethane/urethane.  almost everybody in this community is using urethane bc it gives amazing results such as the clarity and shine BUT that comes at a price which is how temperamental it is, namely to moisture/humidity.  plus, it has a very short pot life. i dont know of any that you can work with more than 20minutes. epoxy resin does not react this way to humidity and some epoxy can sit around for over 24hrs and still remain pourable, but you cant polish it in the same way you can urethanes. polyester is typically the most inexpensive. it cures with a very hard finish and can be buffed to a shine. on the other hand it will yellow over time (unless it never sees any sunlight.) now, in my opinion this stuff is nasty as heck. when i go to the resin shop that sells this stuff i feel like my throat swells up. epoxy has less "harmful" vapors (honestly all of this stuff is harmful BUT some are more harmful than others) and urethane the least vaporous. and i wouldnt touch any of it when it is wet. this should serve as a guideline. do more research and talk to manufacturers to find whats right for u. cheers


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Awesome reply, thanks so much! I recently bought some Smooth Cast 326. It doesn't tell me what type of resin it is but looking forward to tweaking and seeing what works/doesn't!

Are there actually serious negative effects to not using a respirator with urethane?
326 is a great clear urethane resin. it will work well for transparent and colored effects. and yes the vapor is harmful. i found this at blog.greenguide.com

Effects of Polyurethane to the Body
Scientists found isocyanates, a compound that can bring potential harm to one’s lungs, in materials made up of polyurethane. Exposure to the said product can cause lung irritation and asthma attacks. Furthermore, it can also irritate skin and cause difficulty in breathing when lung infections develop. People with migraine and other related body issues should keep at bay from polyurethane fumes because it can swell brain cells that bring about severe head pain. Meanwhile, pregnant women, elderly and sick and young children should never be exposed to polyurethane fumes because it could cause coughs and colds, wheezing, and other symptoms that are related to asthma. Workers who are frequently exposed to polyurethane fumes experience several health disorders including unsettled stomach, vomiting, and dizziness.
How to Avoid Inhaling Polyurethane
Keep away in places where polyurethane fumigation is frequently done such as areas where finishes and varnishes are usually processed. Avoid using polyurethane foam as your bed mattress and steer clear in your home where such job is still ongoing. Open all windows and doors and make sure that the room where wood finishes and varnishes are being done is well ventilated. Finally, do an independent research about polyurethane. After all, knowledge is the key to having a healthy body and sound mind.


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Offline KeLorean

  • Posts: 167
  • Location: Space Coast, FL
Re: Resin types
« Reply #7 on: Fri, 11 August 2017, 17:25:55 »
i will do a post soon on respirators. it is a good topic to cover bc it can be a complex world to navigate, but still very important


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Offline klaushouse

  • Posts: 36
Re: Resin types
« Reply #8 on: Sat, 12 August 2017, 00:38:39 »
Oh wow well thanks so much for all this info, based on this I think I'll probably invest in a respirator just to be safe. Not responsible for the cost to ignore! Thanks so much. :)

Offline KeLorean

  • Posts: 167
  • Location: Space Coast, FL
Re: Resin types
« Reply #9 on: Sat, 12 August 2017, 01:27:02 »
Oh wow well thanks so much for all this info, based on this I think I'll probably invest in a respirator just to be safe. Not responsible for the cost to ignore! Thanks so much. :)
ok. well if you're anything like me then you probably don't want to wait to do a lot of research, so let me tell u the key things to look for in a respirator. 1) get one with changeable filters. it will cost a little more BUT you wont have to rebuy another one every couple months. 2)you need to use a respirator and filters that protect against ORGANIC VAPORS. this resin puts off a vapor thats is "organic," meaning it is a carbon-based molecule and it is dangerous to inhale. i use a 3M, 6200 half face respiratory (https://www.amazon.com/3M-6200-Half-Cartridges-Piece/dp/B001QF9C5C) with 60923 cartridges (https://www.amazon.com/gp/aw/d/B00AEFCKKY/ref=pd_aw_vtph_328_bs_1?ie=UTF8&psc=1&refRID=PS13P28B0TKF1BZ1T65X) or just grab it at home depot. filters last for 6 months after opened. also make sure you dont wear facial hair, fit the respirator properly and do a seal test every time u put it on.  watch this video
at around 3:30. have fun.


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