Author Topic: Chinese USB Hall Effect Keyboard - Review and Impressions  (Read 24158 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline saxophone

  • Posts: 112
Re: Chinese USB Hall Effect Keyboard - Review and Impressions
« Reply #400 on: Sun, 19 March 2017, 05:48:16 »
@tp4: there's no mention of anything like that on the manual that came with the board.

If it's possible to implement calibration or adjusting actuation for individual switch then please make it available. I need this.

Oh and also forgot to mention, the thickness of the slider varies on the board as well. Scotch tape trick was actually not enough for some of the keys so I had to resort to using the thicker electrical tape to deal with it. Picture of the board:


/OT: The keycaps that came with the board are the same type as the ones used on the KANANIC DKD so I'm now able to do this:

Good stuff, as I was originally missing the "-_" keycap for the DKD set.
« Last Edit: Sun, 19 March 2017, 08:25:09 by saxophone »

Offline ander

  • Posts: 1067
  • Location: Vancouver, Canada
  • Annoyingly Normal
Re: Chinese USB Hall Effect Keyboard - Review and Impressions
« Reply #401 on: Sun, 19 March 2017, 20:09:48 »
XMIT, I look forward to seeing you tonight on Top Clack... For those who haven't watched here is the link: https://www.twitch.tv/topclack

I sure wanted to see this, but it says it's "offline" now. Anyone know where it can still be viewed?


I look forward to a version of these boards that you don't have to open up and "fix" (lube, clip, re-spring, etc.) in order to make them feel right.

To be fair, XMIT isn't a big KB company with an entire QA department. He developed this board from scratch. When you do something this ambitious and detailed, there are bound to be a few issues. Fortunately, most of us enjoy tweaking boards and providing feedback. That's why GH's so great.


...The bamboo board also gets a lot of problems when exposed to moisture. This is my own fault since painting it = moisture but I'm writing this down for anyone who wants to try same stuff...

Yikes, you painted your board?? I think the natural bamboo's so beautiful, I can't imagine why anyone would want to hide it—but whatever blows your skirt up, as they say.

For what it's worth: When painting any new wood surface—especially if you're using a water-based paint, rather than shellac or an oil-based finish—it's wise to apply a wood sealer first. I'm guessing that would've prevented the problems you described. Here's a useful page about it.


Lastly, I suggest scrapping the selling the board pre-assembled and instead simply sell the board as kits... People who'd care about hall effect are most probably at enthusiast anyways. They'll probably want to fiddle with the board themselves so paying for pre-assembled pieces seems like waste of money to me...

If you offer boards in kit form only, it's an inescapable fact that you're addressing a considerably smaller market. This was a start-up project, where a lot of capital went into gearing up for the boards before the first prototype was made. XMIT could confirm it—but I think that with something like this, done by an individual working with a manufacturer, it wouldn't have been viable to offer kits only.
Typing about keyboards is like getting a parrot and teaching it to say "I'm a parrot, I'm a parrot."

Offline dante

  • Posts: 2910
  • Location: Chicken & Broccoli
  • Low profile or bust.
Re: Chinese USB Hall Effect Keyboard - Review and Impressions
« Reply #402 on: Sun, 19 March 2017, 20:27:29 »
XMIT, I look forward to seeing you tonight on Top Clack... For those who haven't watched here is the link: https://www.twitch.tv/topclack

I sure wanted to see this, but it says it's "offline" now. Anyone know where it can still be viewed?

https://www.twitch.tv/topclack/videos/all

OR you can see it via manofinterests youtube channel:

https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCTJRSH0vGvD0qzxj2TnoKXA/videos

Offline ander

  • Posts: 1067
  • Location: Vancouver, Canada
  • Annoyingly Normal
Re: Chinese USB Hall Effect Keyboard - Review and Impressions
« Reply #403 on: Sun, 19 March 2017, 20:41:46 »
https://www.twitch.tv/topclack/videos/all
  OR you can see it via manofinterests youtube channel:
https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCTJRSH0vGvD0qzxj2TnoKXA/videos

Thanks! 1.5 hour of keyboard-geek goodness (although, dudes, you really need to antialias your headshots on your black title screen, LOL). After knowing José so long, it's fun to see and hear him as a real person.

I've been so busy, my XMIT HE board has been sitting unboxed on our kitchen counter for the last few days. The anticipation was fun, but today I resolved to finally sit down and open 'er up.


163417-0


163419-1


I'm surprised no one's mentioned XMIT's elegant box. That was a very nice touch! The foam corners secure the board very well, and there were air pillows around the box itself... So while I'm sorry to hear that some people found damage, it seems like reasonable precaution was taken. (In addition to being shipped to New Jersey, like all the rest, mine was then sent clear across to Canada's west coast.)

So, here I am, typing on HE switches! In one word: fantastic. The initial comparison with MX Reds is inevitable, but these feel more substantial. There's a certain feeling of authority to them, like the difference between Topres and RDs.


163421-2


I was a bit dubious about the bamboo case—but I wanted a 104 with 70g springs, and that was the deal. I'm glad, because the bamboo's gorgeous. With the snow-white keys, it looks so artistic, like something that'd be at home in an art gallery.

I opted for a set of 50g springs, but I doubt I'll bother with them, as the 70s feel great. The switches themselves are so smooth, I'm not finding it an effort at all to type quickly and accurately.

I have to agree with some others here that the spacebar is unusually noisy. It's tolerable, but has anyone found a way to quieten it?

And whoa, this is an RGB!


163423-3


163425-4


163427-5


163429-6


I was so captivated with the switches, I didn't notice that in the feature list. I have a couple of backlighted boards, but I sheepishly admit this is the first RGB I've owned.  :?)

While the animation effects are fun, I'll just be using one of the static single-colour modes. Given that these LEDs can produce millions of colours, it'd be great to be able to specify some. Is there currently no way to do that? (Does this require "programming"?) Any idea when that'll be possible?

I'd also suggest that when cycling through the animations, it seems unnecessary to turn off the LEDs between each of them... Why not just go from one to the next? Not dramatic enough?

To sum up: Despite the rattly spacebar, I'm quite pleased with XMIT's creation. It's thrilling to be using such legendary—and until now, possible only under the geekiest conditions—switch technology.

We've all been using MKs of one kind or another, any one of which was likely to last till we got too old to type anymore. But now this... There's no stopping us! Buh ha ha!! Okay, I'll restrain myself now and imitate a civilized person.
« Last Edit: Sun, 19 March 2017, 22:30:15 by ander »
Typing about keyboards is like getting a parrot and teaching it to say "I'm a parrot, I'm a parrot."

Offline Skull_Angel

  • Posts: 344
Re: Chinese USB Hall Effect Keyboard - Review and Impressions
« Reply #404 on: Mon, 20 March 2017, 05:57:06 »
I ended up completely disassembling my board yesterday to pop in the new springs and I think I can answer a few of the issues that have popped up here.

Keys sticking may not have anything to do with hitting keys off-center at times - There is a glue used to help hold the magnets in place on MOST of the sliders, and it seems to stay tacky rather then fully drying; on some of them, the glue seems to fall out, stick to the board, and "grab" the switch when bottomed out. I found this happened to four keys on my board.

Keys actuating at different heights - The sliders are not all uniform; many of the sliders have slightly different shape, I'm not sure if this is a die issue or injection (more likely) issue. While this is an issue, the bigger issue is that the magnet placement in the sliders doesn't seem to be uniform.

My board came in decent condition with the only gripe being the quality of the case (I'll need to shave the edges to get them to sit flush and repaint the backing, lots of scratches and paint globs, lol). I will be keeping it to support this project, but am more so looking forward to seeing improvements made.

I'll probably be keeping this one as a museum piece for now

XMIT - when you get them to increase the quality of the sliders, could you give us the option to buy them?

Online zslane

  • Posts: 1229
  • Location: Los Angeles, CA, USA
Re: Chinese USB Hall Effect Keyboard - Review and Impressions
« Reply #405 on: Mon, 20 March 2017, 12:16:03 »
To be fair, XMIT isn't a big KB company with an entire QA department. He developed this board from scratch. When you do something this ambitious and detailed, there are bound to be a few issues. Fortunately, most of us enjoy tweaking boards and providing feedback. That's why GH's so great.

Oh, I understand all of that, and I think XMIT is doing yoeman's work putting all this together. The fact that anyone is working so diligently to revive Hall Effect keyboards is worthy of celebration.

It's just that I am not into tweaking, hacking, or (re-)building keyboards. Swapping keycaps (and installing silencing rings on TMX sliders when I'm desperate enough) is where I draw the line. If a keyboard isn't a mature, mostly problem-free product that has all the essential specs I need right out of the box, then I'm not going to get too excited about it, much less purchase it. I'm not really into investing in other people's R&D. Don't get me wrong, such investment is a worthy thing, it's just not my thing.

Therefore, I will wait for these HE boards to become more polished, and to come in the configuration I am looking forward without me having to open it up and "tweak", "hack", or "mod" it in any way (aside from deploying my favorite MX-stemmed keycaps). At the end of the day, I just want to type on it, I don't want to (re-)build it.

Online tp4tissue

  • * Destiny Supporter
  • Posts: 10448
  • Location: Official Geekhack Public Defender..
  • OmniExpert of: Rice, Top-Ramen, Ergodox, n Females
Re: Chinese USB Hall Effect Keyboard - Review and Impressions
« Reply #406 on: Mon, 20 March 2017, 12:18:35 »
To be fair, XMIT isn't a big KB company with an entire QA department. He developed this board from scratch. When you do something this ambitious and detailed, there are bound to be a few issues. Fortunately, most of us enjoy tweaking boards and providing feedback. That's why GH's so great.

Oh, I understand all of that, and I think XMIT is doing yoeman's work putting all this together. The fact that anyone is working so diligently to revive Hall Effect keyboards is worthy of celebration.

It's just that I am not into tweaking, hacking, or (re-)building keyboards. Swapping keycaps (and installing silencing rings on TMX sliders when I'm desperate enough) is where I draw the line. If a keyboard isn't a mature, mostly problem-free product that has all the essential specs I need right out of the box, then I'm not going to get too excited about it, much less purchase it. I'm not really into investing in other people's R&D. Don't get me wrong, such investment is a worthy thing, it's just not my thing.

Therefore, I will wait for these HE boards to become more polished, and to come in the configuration I am looking forward without me having to open it up and "tweak", "hack", or "mod" it in any way (aside from deploying my favorite MX-stemmed keycaps). At the end of the day, I just want to type on it, I don't want to (re-)build it.


What ?

Xmit didn't develop anything..  He and Massdrop got on the phone with the vendor in china (who developed and produced the board)

Bought a bunch

and Sold it to you guys for a profit..

This is an off the shelf resale..   Kind of like ebay flipping.



hahahaha..

Online tp4tissue

  • * Destiny Supporter
  • Posts: 10448
  • Location: Official Geekhack Public Defender..
  • OmniExpert of: Rice, Top-Ramen, Ergodox, n Females
Re: Chinese USB Hall Effect Keyboard - Review and Impressions
« Reply #407 on: Mon, 20 March 2017, 12:24:17 »
@tp4: there's no mention of anything like that on the manual that came with the board.

If it's possible to implement calibration or adjusting actuation for individual switch then please make it available. I need this.



Well, We don't know the part number on the sensor they used..  So if it's not an analogue circuit then it can't be tuned..

My guess is that it's not.. but don't know.. it might be..  Gotta ask xmit....

Or IDK..  Xmit could give us the company's phone number and we can call um up and ask them..

There are more than enough sifos on this forum to call china up.. hahahaha



But, I'd imagine it's kind of like a drug-dealer situation where,  XMIT/ Massdrop want to remain exclusive flippers of this company's keyboard for as long as possible.. without giving away their sources,  because if they gave away the source,  then they can't remain as middlemen..

At least that's my impression of this business structure so far.

Offline dante

  • Posts: 2910
  • Location: Chicken & Broccoli
  • Low profile or bust.
Re: Chinese USB Hall Effect Keyboard - Review and Impressions
« Reply #408 on: Mon, 20 March 2017, 12:52:40 »
Per the topclack interview we know XMIT doesn't want to get rid of the current manufacturers but I got really excited when it was suggested it may theoretically be possible to move manufacturing to the states.

I don't know if it would be in Unicomp's wheel house or if Signature Plastics can create backlit caps for it; but it would be extremely cool to get this board made as much as possible in the US.
« Last Edit: Mon, 20 March 2017, 12:54:42 by dante »

Online tp4tissue

  • * Destiny Supporter
  • Posts: 10448
  • Location: Official Geekhack Public Defender..
  • OmniExpert of: Rice, Top-Ramen, Ergodox, n Females
Re: Chinese USB Hall Effect Keyboard - Review and Impressions
« Reply #409 on: Mon, 20 March 2017, 13:11:31 »
Per the topclack interview we know XMIT doesn't want to get rid of the current manufacturers but I got really excited when it was suggested it may theoretically be possible to move manufacturing to the states.

I don't know if it would be in Unicomp's wheel house or if Signature Plastics can create backlit caps for it; but it would be extremely cool to get this board made as much as possible in the US.

This keyboard is a low tech electronic product.. where the margin is typically too low to support US manufacturing/ labor..


The way the currency is pegged.  we get roughly a ..3 to 1 on production..

If you were to spend usd $1 in the us, you can produce something of usd $3 quality in china..


This keyboard sold through 1x middlemen (xmit/massdrop), @ $100 probably cost around $15-30 to produce if their factory is already producing in ~2000+ quantities.. (they most likely are)


So..  if you moved manufacturing to the USA,  just to match what is already being sold, this keyboard would cost you $100 to make....


And you'll probably be paying $200 for it because that's how marketing utilizes -Made in USA-.


If you took $200 and spent that in china,  you'd make a fking iphone..   

All aluminum Chassis.. 0.01mm precision milling.. Japanese sensors.. Samsung custom keyboard controller.


--Just sayin''






Offline saxophone

  • Posts: 112
Re: Chinese USB Hall Effect Keyboard - Review and Impressions
« Reply #410 on: Mon, 20 March 2017, 13:47:03 »
Following Skull_Angels mention I've managed to remove the magnets from the slides, and can now "calibrate" the keys to actuate at the distance I want them to by altering the height of the magnets. Going to take some time but it's all good now.

Online tp4tissue

  • * Destiny Supporter
  • Posts: 10448
  • Location: Official Geekhack Public Defender..
  • OmniExpert of: Rice, Top-Ramen, Ergodox, n Females
Re: Chinese USB Hall Effect Keyboard - Review and Impressions
« Reply #411 on: Mon, 20 March 2017, 14:03:08 »
Following Skull_Angels mention I've managed to remove the magnets from the slides, and can now "calibrate" the keys to actuate at the distance I want them to by altering the height of the magnets. Going to take some time but it's all good now.


does a depth rod from a (digi cal) fit into the slot for where the magnet is clasped.

it'd be interesting if you can determine the precise difference between distance and actuation.

Offline Neo.X

  • Posts: 391
  • Location: Mississauga, CA
Re: Chinese USB Hall Effect Keyboard - Review and Impressions
« Reply #412 on: Mon, 20 March 2017, 14:10:54 »

Keys actuating at different heights - The sliders are not all uniform; many of the sliders have slightly different shape, I'm not sure if this is a die issue or injection (more likely) issue. While this is an issue, the bigger issue is that the magnet placement in the sliders doesn't seem to be uniform.



Thank you, Skull_Angel. I think that's the issue for me, no wonder typing on this keyboard feels a little bit weird and uncomfortable.

I do hope that XMIT will offer purchasing for just improved slider and spring in the future.

All those keyboards will be lost in time....

Offline saxophone

  • Posts: 112
Re: Chinese USB Hall Effect Keyboard - Review and Impressions
« Reply #413 on: Mon, 20 March 2017, 16:32:00 »
Well, time to spend some more hours on this. My personal favorite keyboard right now is using gat reds where I've spend time adjusting the leaves in each switch so that they uniformly actuate at 0.5-1mm. This is going to take quite some time with hall effect board. The results should be good however.

Offline digi

  • elite af tbh
  • * Destiny Supporter
  • Posts: 2870
  • Howbow dah?
Re: Chinese USB Hall Effect Keyboard - Review and Impressions
« Reply #414 on: Mon, 20 March 2017, 16:34:01 »
does a depth rod from a (digi cal) fit into the slot for where the magnet is clasped.

I should really know the answer to that :P
RF55 87U

Offline Skull_Angel

  • Posts: 344
Re: Chinese USB Hall Effect Keyboard - Review and Impressions
« Reply #415 on: Mon, 20 March 2017, 16:34:58 »
Following Skull_Angels mention I've managed to remove the magnets from the slides, and can now "calibrate" the keys to actuate at the distance I want them to by altering the height of the magnets. Going to take some time but it's all good now.


does a depth rod from a (digi cal) fit into the slot for where the magnet is clasped.

it'd be interesting if you can determine the precise difference between distance and actuation.

I think it should fit, the issue is cleaning out the tacky glue on most of them first. It's almost more like a soft plastic plug that's dipped in something and stuffed in there for some sliders.

Edit: curious, has anyone tested actuation latency?
« Last Edit: Mon, 20 March 2017, 16:43:23 by Skull_Angel »

Offline ander

  • Posts: 1067
  • Location: Vancouver, Canada
  • Annoyingly Normal
Re: Chinese USB Hall Effect Keyboard - Review and Impressions
« Reply #416 on: Mon, 20 March 2017, 17:40:19 »
Speaking of XMIT's cool box, I don't think anyone remarked on the lid's magnetic catches, either. That's class. The fit's so close, at first I thought I had to slide an inner box out sideways. Okay, I admit it, I actually tried to do that. Fortunately there's no photo documentation.  :?)


Keys sticking may not have anything to do with hitting keys off-center at times - There is a glue used to help hold the magnets in place on MOST of the sliders, and it seems to stay tacky rather then fully drying... Keys actuating at different heights - The sliders are not all uniform; many of the sliders have slightly different shape, I'm not sure if this is a die issue or injection (more likely) issue. While this is an issue, the bigger issue is that the magnet placement in the sliders doesn't seem to be uniform.

Considering how carefully and accurately my board seems to have been made, I'm amazed to hear about these irregularities. I can only guess that some of you got boards from earlier production runs.

I've used my share of MKs, and  speaking for myself, I can't feel any irregularities in how this board actuates. I realize some of you guys have considerably more experience, though, and may be more sensitive (i.e. perceptive) to such things.

Just curious: Did you actually feel these variances? Or did you need to examine the parts to determine them?

Or maybe you used weights? That's fair game, of course, since GH is as much about technology and measurement as it is esthetics.


My board came in decent condition with the only gripe being the quality of the case... I'll probably be keeping this one as a museum piece for now...

LOL, that doesn't seem far away from the truth. It's remarkable to realize these are the first HE boards in—what, 20 years?—and maybe even the first ever that weren't produced for specific (and often, secret) proprietary applications.


But, I'd imagine it's kind of like a drug-dealer situation where,  XMIT/ Massdrop want to remain exclusive flippers of this company's keyboard for as long as possible.. without giving away their sources,  because if they gave away the source,  then they can't remain as middlemen...

Maybe you're not being serious—but geez, I think we need to cut XMIT a bit of slack. This was a huge undertaking for one person, working with a manufacturer halfway around the world. Most of us would never imagine taking on something like this.

And it's not like he bought a bunch of existing boards and resold them. As he's meticulously described here, this idea existed in quite a rudimentary form when he got started. So the "drug dealer" analogy seems pretty inappropriate. (Well, okay, MKs are a type of drug habit—but besides that.)


...If you moved manufacturing to the USA,  just to match what is already being sold, this keyboard would cost you $100 to make. And you'll probably be paying $200 for it because that's how marketing utilizes -Made in USA-.

Indeed, it's amazing what Unicomp has managed to do with their US-made buckling spring boards. People site little flaws in them, but if U. tried to make them to IBM's standards, they'd need to charge three times as much to stay afloat.


Well, time to spend some more hours on this. My personal favorite keyboard right now is using gat reds where I've spend time adjusting the leaves in each switch so that they uniformly actuate at 0.5-1mm. This is going to take quite some time with hall effect board. The results should be good however.

It's amazing (maybe even pathological, LOL) that you guys are this good. And XMIT must've been prepared for his boards to be gone over here with fine-tooth combs. Still, I don't envy any product developer who throws his boards to the techno-wolves like this.  :?)
Typing about keyboards is like getting a parrot and teaching it to say "I'm a parrot, I'm a parrot."

Offline Skull_Angel

  • Posts: 344
Re: Chinese USB Hall Effect Keyboard - Review and Impressions
« Reply #417 on: Tue, 21 March 2017, 00:13:44 »
Speaking of XMIT's cool box, I don't think anyone remarked on the lid's magnetic catches, either. That's class. The fit's so close, at first I thought I had to slide an inner box out sideways. Okay, I admit it, I actually tried to do that. Fortunately there's no photo documentation.  :?)


Keys sticking may not have anything to do with hitting keys off-center at times - There is a glue used to help hold the magnets in place on MOST of the sliders, and it seems to stay tacky rather then fully drying... Keys actuating at different heights - The sliders are not all uniform; many of the sliders have slightly different shape, I'm not sure if this is a die issue or injection (more likely) issue. While this is an issue, the bigger issue is that the magnet placement in the sliders doesn't seem to be uniform.

Considering how carefully and accurately my board seems to have been made, I'm amazed to hear about these irregularities. I can only guess that some of you got boards from earlier production runs.

I've used my share of MKs, and  speaking for myself, I can't feel any irregularities in how this board actuates. I realize some of you guys have considerably more experience, though, and may be more sensitive (i.e. perceptive) to such things.

Just curious: Did you actually feel these variances? Or did you need to examine the parts to determine them?

Or maybe you used weights? That's fair game, of course, since GH is as much about technology and measurement as it is esthetics.


My board came in decent condition with the only gripe being the quality of the case... I'll probably be keeping this one as a museum piece for now...

LOL, that doesn't seem far away from the truth. It's remarkable to realize these are the first HE boards in—what, 20 years?—and maybe even the first ever that weren't produced for specific (and often, secret) proprietary applications.


But, I'd imagine it's kind of like a drug-dealer situation where,  XMIT/ Massdrop want to remain exclusive flippers of this company's keyboard for as long as possible.. without giving away their sources,  because if they gave away the source,  then they can't remain as middlemen...

Maybe you're not being serious—but geez, I think we need to cut XMIT a bit of slack. This was a huge undertaking for one person, working with a manufacturer halfway around the world. Most of us would never imagine taking on something like this.

And it's not like he bought a bunch of existing boards and resold them. As he's meticulously described here, this idea existed in quite a rudimentary form when he got started. So the "drug dealer" analogy seems pretty inappropriate. (Well, okay, MKs are a type of drug habit—but besides that.)


...If you moved manufacturing to the USA,  just to match what is already being sold, this keyboard would cost you $100 to make. And you'll probably be paying $200 for it because that's how marketing utilizes -Made in USA-.

Indeed, it's amazing what Unicomp has managed to do with their US-made buckling spring boards. People site little flaws in them, but if U. tried to make them to IBM's standards, they'd need to charge three times as much to stay afloat.


Well, time to spend some more hours on this. My personal favorite keyboard right now is using gat reds where I've spend time adjusting the leaves in each switch so that they uniformly actuate at 0.5-1mm. This is going to take quite some time with hall effect board. The results should be good however.

It's amazing (maybe even pathological, LOL) that you guys are this good. And XMIT must've been prepared for his boards to be gone over here with fine-tooth combs. Still, I don't envy any product developer who throws his boards to the techno-wolves like this.  :?)

I wouldn't doubt if the company reused older sliders that they thought seemed to be good. I first noticed it before swapping the springs; I'd been using the board for a bit over a week and typing "felt" funny, so I decided to swap the springs to see if a heavier actuation force would remedy it.

Being the way I am, I completely disassembled the board to check things out while putting in the new springs and found what looked like glue blobs on a few of the sensors on the PCB; well I found out those blobs came from inside of the sliders, so I ****ed around and examined all of them. About a quarter of the sliders didn't have glue, but the magnets seemed to be fit quite snug and looked quite uniform. The other three-quarters of the sliders were filled with glue that ranged from well placed to somewhat globbed on; while it likely skewed visual inspection, I could tell some of the magnets weren't seated properly and used a 1.5mm flat head to snug them down.

The overall feel is a bit better now, but it does feel off a bit still. This coupled with the greater level of key wobble compared to Cherry/Gateron MX is just enough to make me want to move back to my Varmilo w/ Gat blacks. I'm not saying it's a bad board, I do definitely see the potential, I just hope it really shows that level before a majority of people give it a bad rap for QC.

Offline Niomosy

  • Posts: 1045
Re: Chinese USB Hall Effect Keyboard - Review and Impressions
« Reply #418 on: Tue, 21 March 2017, 00:47:40 »
Wobble!  That's the word I'm looking for.  There does seem to be a bit of... a feel not quite as stable as my Cherry MX reds Ducky board going on there.  I'm not quite sure I'd call it wobble but the switches don't quite feel as stable as the MX reds do.