Author Topic: 4 Pin Ps2  (Read 90710 times)

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Offline tobr1an

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4 Pin Ps2
« on: Sun, 20 May 2012, 21:30:09 »
I recently got a really old keyboard from my friend and it contain white alps. The adapter is 4 pin ps/2 I believe. Is there anyway to convert this 4 pin into USB?

Offline mbc

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4 Pin Ps2
« Reply #1 on: Sun, 20 May 2012, 22:19:10 »
An active converter like the blue cube..

Offline kishy

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4 Pin Ps2
« Reply #2 on: Mon, 21 May 2012, 09:31:28 »
Although PS/2 only actually uses 4 pins, the connector has 6 positions and often they all have pins present.

What type of keyboard is it? ADB, Apple Desktop Bus for older Macs, also has 4 pins.
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Offline tobr1an

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4 Pin Ps2
« Reply #3 on: Mon, 21 May 2012, 17:34:22 »
Quote from: kishy;597042
Although PS/2 only actually uses 4 pins, the connector has 6 positions and often they all have pins present.

What type of keyboard is it? ADB, Apple Desktop Bus for older Macs, also has 4 pins.

I really don't know what kind of keyboard it is as I do not see any brand on it what so ever. On the back of the keyboard it say Micro Warehouse, Inc. Model No. Power User 105.

Online Findecanor

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4 Pin Ps2
« Reply #4 on: Mon, 21 May 2012, 18:17:30 »
The "Micro Warehouse, Inc. Power User 105" should be a keyboard for the old Macintosh which speaks the "Apple Desktop Bus" (ADB) protocol.
I had one, here are pictures I took of mine (before I stripped it for parts and put them into my Dell AT101W). Mine had Swedish layout, though.

You need a ADB to USB converter to connect it to a modern computer. Unfortunately, there are not as many of them as there as PS/2 to USB converters.  The only commercial converter that I know of is the "Belkin iMate", which is not always that easy to find.
If you have some skills with soldering circuits, then you could build one yourself: Get a Teensy USB Development Board, connect the wires and/or ports to it and load Hasu's ADB to USB keyboard Converter for Teensy on it.
« Last Edit: Mon, 21 May 2012, 18:19:32 by Findecanor »
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