Author Topic: The Living Soldering Thread  (Read 1636022 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline CPTBadAss

  • Woke up like this
  • Posts: 14305
  • Rich Homie Huang.
Re: The Living Soldering Thread
« Reply #100 on: Sat, 04 May 2013, 07:56:00 »
Yes please TJ. I'd like some pics and refreshers ^_^

Offline tjcaustin

  • King Klaxon
  • * Maker
  • Thread Starter
  • Posts: 3556
  • Location: Dallas-ish
  • King of All Klaxon Sciences and Cable Makery
    • Buy stuff
Re: The Living Soldering Thread
« Reply #101 on: Sun, 05 May 2013, 14:40:47 »
Table ingredients:

   1 - 33” x 49” sheet of .25” MDF (part a) (It doesn’t have to be exactly this, I had it laying around and build the rest to a 24” x 48” surface)

   3 - 2” x 4” x 144” woodstuff
   Specific cuts:
      4 - 24” length (part b)

                4 - 30” length (part c)
      
      4 - 48” length (part d)

   72 - 3” wood screws (connector e)

Solder spool ingredients:

   1 - .25” dowel

   2 - 4” eye screws

   2 - Hitch pin clips
 
Miscellaneous station ingredients:

   1 - 24” under cabinet light (I may add another)
   
   2 - 6 plug surge protectors (or any you’d prefer)

   1 - 2” hook screw (to hang heat gun on)

   1 - Focal XS Bookshelf speaker set up (or whatever speakers you want to use.  Music is important)
   
   1 - monitor with hdmi input

   1 - roku


How to Put Table Together (derived from - http://www.artofmanliness.com/2012/04/04/how-to-make-a-work-bench/):

   1. Screw everything together in a logical manner that resembles a table, if you’ve somehow managed to make anything that isn’t table-esque, continue to step 2.

   2. Take one (1) part D and caress it tenderly, but be careful for splinters (not the sensei).  Butt it perpendicularly at one end with an end of one (1) part B.

   3. Use three (3) of connector E to join these two pieces of wood together in wooden matrimony.


   4. At the other end of the currently stroked part D, intersect another part B and use three (3) more screws to turn this into a three-way of woodiness.

   5. As you have now began the frame for your table top, it is time to complete it by first taking one (1) part D and six (6) of connector E to repeat steps three (3) twice (two times) at the opposing end of parts B.

   6.  Time for center support, take one (1) of your remaining to (2) part D and gently slide it into place halfway between the other tue (2) part Ds (heh, double Ds) that are already attached.  This should be at approximately twelve (12) inches from either edge of parts B.



   7.  Congrats, you’ve finished the basic frame for the tabletop to attach to.  You deserve a reward and break, but not beer, though.

   8. Back from your break?  Good, it’s time to complete the bottom leg supports and attach the legs of your table to it, and then attach that to what you just finished.

   9.  Remember back when you started, how you followed the directions numbered two through four?  Go do it again, but remember you only have one more of part D left.

   10. Take one (1) of part C and firmly push it into the left corner of the C shape (get it?) that you’ve just created.  Use three (3) of connector E to ensure that it does not, and cannot, fall over in the lure of that mistress of mistresses, gravity.


   11.  Do step ten (10) again on the right side of your C shape.

   12. At the left side of the open end of your C, use three (3) of connector E to attach another (this is number three (3) (four (4), if you’re back from step thirteen (13)) of part C to this end.  Be sure to space it back just far enough to be able to smoothly slide into the top frame later.


   13. Go do that again on the last corner that doesn’t have a thirty (30) inch vertical piece of timber attached to it.

   14.  Oh boy, are you excited?  You should be, it’s time to put the frame of your tabletop on the reinforced legs you just made.  Read on to find out how.

   15. Follow the rule “Work smarter, not harder” by having your top frame laying flush on the ground.

   16. Take your table legs and rotate them one hundred eighty (180) degrees so as your C shape is up in the air, as if it just don’t care.

   17.  Did you make sure those leg ends were in the corners of the top piece, where everything would be nice and flush and ready for a lot (12 at least) of connector E to join it all together?  Why not?  Do that now.



   18. Welp, good job building an upside-down table, genius.  Go buy something prebuilt from a hardware store and cry.  Or be a man and flip dat shiii pi (π) radians (don’t worry, I’ll wait for you to figure it out.  Be sure to use at least 180 digits of the number that represents pi(π) to calculate what it would be in degrees).

   19.  Hey, you have a table skeleton and it’s the correct side up now.  High five, you’re almost at the finish line.

   20. Place part A (eyyyy!) on top of table, but do not celebrate just yet as that could just slide off at any time of its own accord (not the car).  Use ten (10) to fifteen (15) (fourteen (14) is good, too) of connector E to ensure that your tabletop will never run away as part of your neighbor’s subwoofer box.

   21.  Know how I said you couldn’t celebrate just a few minutes ago (it was just a few, right?  It’s just screws. BTW, I should have mentioned this before, but if you don’t have a powered screwdriver (also known as a drill, electric screwdriver or that green thing that spins the fake dong in those special videos you watch), you’re going to have a bad time.  Seriously, screwing all these screws manually?  What are you, a heathen?)  You should celebrate the fact that you have completed a table and now may die a complete man (or lady).

Offline The_Beast

  • * Maker
  • Posts: 3964
  • Location: Wisconsin
  • I like wood ಠ_๏
Re: The Living Soldering Thread
« Reply #102 on: Sun, 05 May 2013, 14:43:47 »
Nice butt....


























...joints that is (it's funny because those are butt joints)
Vendor Status: Sadly, not taking any orders/pre-orders at this time

Vendor Quick Links: | Vendor Forum | Hardwood Wrist Rests | Hardwood 60% Cases | Customer Gallery | Giveaway |

Offline tjcaustin

  • King Klaxon
  • * Maker
  • Thread Starter
  • Posts: 3556
  • Location: Dallas-ish
  • King of All Klaxon Sciences and Cable Makery
    • Buy stuff
Re: The Living Soldering Thread
« Reply #103 on: Sun, 05 May 2013, 14:47:32 »
I like butt joints and I cannot lie.

Offline samwisekoi

  • MAWG since 1997
  • * Administrator
  • Posts: 2480
  • Location: Mt. View, California
  • Sorry, moving houses. Be back ASAP.
    • Tweet samwisekoi
Re: The Living Soldering Thread
« Reply #104 on: Sun, 05 May 2013, 15:32:39 »
Good thread.

No one has mentioned all of the little hand tools that make a complicated soldering job so much easier.  Mine are at work, so I'll add them tomorrow.

Also, heat guns are worth getting quality to make heat shrink shrink instead of melt or burn.  And continuity testers, which used to be built into every DMM, but now are a hard to find extra item.  But again, they make some jobs (e.g. testing a hard-wired keyboard matrix) so much easier.

Finally, somewhere on the bench should be a variable power supply.  Most circuits eventually need electricity, and having a source for 1.5, 3.3, 5, 7, 12v, etc. is totally handy.

A window is good, too.  Mmmm, lead smoke...

 - Ron I samwisekoi
I like keyboards and case modding.  Everything about a computer should be silent -- except the KEYBOARD!

'85 IBM F-122/Soarer Keyboard |  Leopold FC200 TKL (Browns) + GH36 Keypad (Browns/Greens) | GH-122 (Whites/Greens) with Nuclear Data Green keycaps in a Unicomp case

Offline tjcaustin

  • King Klaxon
  • * Maker
  • Thread Starter
  • Posts: 3556
  • Location: Dallas-ish
  • King of All Klaxon Sciences and Cable Makery
    • Buy stuff
Re: The Living Soldering Thread
« Reply #105 on: Sun, 05 May 2013, 15:52:12 »
Good thread.

No one has mentioned all of the little hand tools that make a complicated soldering job so much easier.  Mine are at work, so I'll add them tomorrow.

Also, heat guns are worth getting quality to make heat shrink shrink instead of melt or burn.  And continuity testers, which used to be built into every DMM, but now are a hard to find extra item.  But again, they make some jobs (e.g. testing a hard-wired keyboard matrix) so much easier.

Finally, somewhere on the bench should be a variable power supply.  Most circuits eventually need electricity, and having a source for 1.5, 3.3, 5, 7, 12v, etc. is totally handy.

A window is good, too.  Mmmm, lead smoke...

 - Ron I samwisekoi

Thoughts about something like this? http://www.adafruit.com/products/184?gclid=COP5pZnp_7YCFYtT4AoddhYAWg I'm thinking I can build a variable power supply what with how I've built this nice set up and all.

I continually forget to add a smoke absorber link, but that's done now, too.  Heat gun and dmm are added, as well.  I'll add tools later.

Offline pentype

  • Posts: 3
  • Location: Washington, DC
Re: The Living Soldering Thread
« Reply #106 on: Sun, 05 May 2013, 16:06:11 »
I have this:
Radio Shack de-soldering iron w/bulb - http://www.radioshack.com/product/index.jsp?productId=2062731

I can report that it works well for larger solder joints, however for smaller joints on the bottomside of the pcb, i have found it more effective to "blow" the solder by pushing the bulb instead of sucking it in. It usually turns up on the other side as a solder bead, cools quickly enough not to harm anything.

Iron Works in reverse also, but you have to melt down some solder in a ceramic container, and suck into the top chamber and let it reheat. Solder flows from tip to heated components pretty nicely.

Offline Thechemist

  • Posts: 244
  • Location: East Coast USA
Re: The Living Soldering Thread
« Reply #107 on: Sun, 05 May 2013, 16:56:33 »
That Sinometer is junk a cheap rebrand ( can't calibrate and not very accurate ), I was doing research on which is the best DMM to buy and the one i posted earlier is the best bang for your buck and not that much more than that junky meter.

Offline linziyi

  • Posts: 386
  • The one with many questions
Re: The Living Soldering Thread
« Reply #108 on: Sun, 05 May 2013, 17:05:10 »
How long does it take to process the whole keyboard? (assuming it is a TKL)
Ducky DK9008G2 Pro

"Much to learn you still have" --Yoda


Offline Aranair

  • Posts: 215
  • Location: Singapore
  • Software Engineer @ PocketMath
    • Tech blog
Re: The Living Soldering Thread
« Reply #109 on: Mon, 06 May 2013, 09:43:07 »
Gonna try and get into soldering but having a hard time finding some of these equipment in Singapore since shipping is way too expensive for a station lol. hopefully i'll be able to find some of these in hardware stores. D:

Present  : HHKB Pro 2 Type-S White | HHKB Pro 2 White Blank | Ergodox EZ
Past      :  Poker 2 Brown | Black Widow Ultimate Blue | Filco TKL Brown

Offline Aranair

  • Posts: 215
  • Location: Singapore
  • Software Engineer @ PocketMath
    • Tech blog
Re: The Living Soldering Thread
« Reply #110 on: Mon, 06 May 2013, 09:44:35 »
quick question: whats the difference between the 63/37 solder vs no clean ones? No clean ones are nearly twice as expensive :/

Present  : HHKB Pro 2 Type-S White | HHKB Pro 2 White Blank | Ergodox EZ
Past      :  Poker 2 Brown | Black Widow Ultimate Blue | Filco TKL Brown

Offline WhiteFireDragon

  • Posts: 2276
    • youtube
Re: The Living Soldering Thread
« Reply #111 on: Mon, 06 May 2013, 11:00:24 »
standard 63/37 have rosin as flux, which leaves a residue after you solder. No-clean has a different type of flux. Just get the normal rosin-core one and leave the flux on there. It doesn't really damage keyboards.

Offline Parak

  • Posts: 532
Re: The Living Soldering Thread
« Reply #112 on: Mon, 06 May 2013, 11:39:54 »
So I'm considering getting a Honeywell HPA-050 for an alternative take on filtering solder fumes. There are papers which suggest that filtration of flux smoke and such are not sufficient with just a regular carbon filter, and that a combination of activated carbon and 99.97+ HEPA is needed.

Professional units do exactly that, but cost $ludicrous. I'm thinking that placing such a desktop filter a few inches away from the soldering area will work just as well, though. If anyone else knows of an approach that combines the two types of filtering in a compact format (DIY or othewise) on the cheap, speak up!

Offline samwisekoi

  • MAWG since 1997
  • * Administrator
  • Posts: 2480
  • Location: Mt. View, California
  • Sorry, moving houses. Be back ASAP.
    • Tweet samwisekoi
Re: The Living Soldering Thread
« Reply #113 on: Tue, 07 May 2013, 08:58:26 »
standard 63/37 have rosin as flux, which leaves a residue after you solder. No-clean has a different type of flux. Just get the normal rosin-core one and leave the flux on there. It doesn't really damage keyboards.

And soap and water and a toothbrush cleans it off if you dislike the discoloration.

So I'm considering getting a Honeywell HPA-050 for an alternative take on filtering solder fumes. There are papers which suggest that filtration of flux smoke and such are not sufficient with just a regular carbon filter, and that a combination of activated carbon and 99.97+ HEPA is needed.

Professional units do exactly that, but cost $ludicrous. I'm thinking that placing such a desktop filter a few inches away from the soldering area will work just as well, though. If anyone else knows of an approach that combines the two types of filtering in a compact format (DIY or othewise) on the cheap, speak up!

Fan.  Window.  Keep children away.  Done.
I like keyboards and case modding.  Everything about a computer should be silent -- except the KEYBOARD!

'85 IBM F-122/Soarer Keyboard |  Leopold FC200 TKL (Browns) + GH36 Keypad (Browns/Greens) | GH-122 (Whites/Greens) with Nuclear Data Green keycaps in a Unicomp case

Offline Aranair

  • Posts: 215
  • Location: Singapore
  • Software Engineer @ PocketMath
    • Tech blog
Re: The Living Soldering Thread
« Reply #114 on: Tue, 07 May 2013, 09:06:51 »
aights lol, thanks :D

Still having a hard time scouting all the equip here!

Present  : HHKB Pro 2 Type-S White | HHKB Pro 2 White Blank | Ergodox EZ
Past      :  Poker 2 Brown | Black Widow Ultimate Blue | Filco TKL Brown

Offline Parak

  • Posts: 532
Re: The Living Soldering Thread
« Reply #115 on: Tue, 07 May 2013, 09:18:31 »
Fan.  Window.  Keep children away.  Done.

Not an option - my soldering equipment will be far away from a window, can't have heat loss in winters, and I sleep in the same room. Also I'm still a child (mentally).

Offline keymaster

  • Topre Revolution Theorist
  • Posts: 1148
Re: The Living Soldering Thread
« Reply #116 on: Tue, 07 May 2013, 12:16:54 »
My makeshift soldering station :p

Offline gnubag

  • Posts: 509
  • Location: California, US
Re: The Living Soldering Thread
« Reply #117 on: Tue, 07 May 2013, 13:01:19 »
My makeshift soldering station :p

until a swich pops off in a weird angle and you will never find it again :)

Offline keymaster

  • Topre Revolution Theorist
  • Posts: 1148
Re: The Living Soldering Thread
« Reply #118 on: Tue, 07 May 2013, 13:04:27 »
My makeshift soldering station :p

until a swich pops off in a weird angle and you will never find it again :)

High stakes soldering. Casuals need not apply.  ;D

Offline Internetlad

  • Posts: 710
Re: The Living Soldering Thread
« Reply #119 on: Tue, 07 May 2013, 16:17:24 »
FYI in the OP the link to the 888D links to the 888. Not complaining as the digital display seems like a PITA.

Is the Weller really worth 15 bucks more than the Hakko? Not that I know anything about anything, but it looks less impressive to me.
"Beep . . . Beep . . . Beep" -Sputnik I


Visit the Typing Test and try!

Offline jdcarpe

  • * Curator
  • Posts: 8854
  • Location: Odessa, TX
  • Live long, and prosper.
Re: The Living Soldering Thread
« Reply #120 on: Tue, 07 May 2013, 16:22:14 »
FX-888 is discontinued. FX-888D is the replacement. Although, you might still be able to find some new old stock 888's somewhere.

FWIW, I don't have a problem using the 888D...
KMAC :: LZ-GH :: WASD CODE :: WASD v2 :: GH60 :: Alps64 :: JD45 :: IBM Model M :: IBM 4704 "Pingmaster"

http://jd40.info :: http://jd45.info


in memoriam

"When I was a kid, I used to take things apart and never put them back together."

Offline Internetlad

  • Posts: 710
Re: The Living Soldering Thread
« Reply #121 on: Tue, 07 May 2013, 16:33:49 »
FX-888 is discontinued. FX-888D is the replacement. Although, you might still be able to find some new old stock 888's somewhere.

That's what i'm saying, in the OP he states the link is for the 888D, but it links to an ebay listing for the 888.
"Beep . . . Beep . . . Beep" -Sputnik I


Visit the Typing Test and try!

Offline jdcarpe

  • * Curator
  • Posts: 8854
  • Location: Odessa, TX
  • Live long, and prosper.
Re: The Living Soldering Thread
« Reply #122 on: Tue, 07 May 2013, 16:38:39 »
FX-888 is discontinued. FX-888D is the replacement. Although, you might still be able to find some new old stock 888's somewhere.

That's what i'm saying, in the OP he states the link is for the 888D, but it links to an ebay listing for the 888.

That seller (niosales), still has the item listing for the 888. But they send you the 888D. So why not save the $8? :D
KMAC :: LZ-GH :: WASD CODE :: WASD v2 :: GH60 :: Alps64 :: JD45 :: IBM Model M :: IBM 4704 "Pingmaster"

http://jd40.info :: http://jd45.info


in memoriam

"When I was a kid, I used to take things apart and never put them back together."

Offline Internetlad

  • Posts: 710
Re: The Living Soldering Thread
« Reply #123 on: Tue, 07 May 2013, 16:43:34 »
I understand now. Really confusing that he didn't change the name of the listing, but noted that he'll send you the D in the description.

To be honest, I think the analog dial and the fact that it's 'MURICA make me lean towards the Weller. It looks clunky and weird, but that's exactly the style that would seem to have high build quality. American Made seems to mean it's either bull**** garbage, or somebody actually took pride in producing it, and from the reviews this doesn't look like garbage.
"Beep . . . Beep . . . Beep" -Sputnik I


Visit the Typing Test and try!

Offline jdcarpe

  • * Curator
  • Posts: 8854
  • Location: Odessa, TX
  • Live long, and prosper.
Re: The Living Soldering Thread
« Reply #124 on: Tue, 07 May 2013, 16:46:26 »
Is the Weller WES51 still in production? I thought it had also been replaced by a digital version, the WESD51.
KMAC :: LZ-GH :: WASD CODE :: WASD v2 :: GH60 :: Alps64 :: JD45 :: IBM Model M :: IBM 4704 "Pingmaster"

http://jd40.info :: http://jd45.info


in memoriam

"When I was a kid, I used to take things apart and never put them back together."

Offline winged mantis

  • Posts: 19
  • Location: United States
Re: The Living Soldering Thread
« Reply #125 on: Tue, 07 May 2013, 18:49:02 »
Is the Weller WES51 still in production? I thought it had also been replaced by a digital version, the WESD51.

The WES51 is on Amazon. I have one and it works nicely for keyboards as long as you set the heat low enough.

Offline Internetlad

  • Posts: 710
Re: The Living Soldering Thread
« Reply #126 on: Wed, 08 May 2013, 12:32:12 »
as far as the solder goes, I can't see myself needing a full pound of it at any time in the near future. are there smaller packs available for a reasonable price? Brands to look for?  as far as solder goes, are all brands more or less the same thing? I can hit up my local RadioShack and look  for some 63/37 .31 solder, if that's what most suggest for switches.

Basically I only need a 5 dollar small pack of the stuff, not a 30 dollar pound box. I understand that the pound is a better value, I just can't see when i'd need it.
"Beep . . . Beep . . . Beep" -Sputnik I


Visit the Typing Test and try!

Offline TheProfosist

  • Posts: 3671
  • Location: Wisconsin, USA
  • Custom Layouts Only!
Re: The Living Soldering Thread
« Reply #127 on: Wed, 08 May 2013, 13:24:03 »
Most places where your going to get a good price only sell the pound as they mostly do sell to individuals. If you want I can sell you some off my roll.

Offline Internetlad

  • Posts: 710
Re: The Living Soldering Thread
« Reply #128 on: Wed, 08 May 2013, 15:32:15 »
Most places where your going to get a good price only sell the pound as they mostly do sell to individuals. If you want I can sell you some off my roll.

Would it still be worth it after shipping?
"Beep . . . Beep . . . Beep" -Sputnik I


Visit the Typing Test and try!

Offline Michael

  • Formerly Bro Caps
  • * Maker
  • Posts: 4634
  • REEEeeeeEEEEEEEEeeeeeeeeeeeEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEeeeee
Re: The Living Soldering Thread
« Reply #129 on: Wed, 08 May 2013, 16:01:36 »

Offline tjcaustin

  • King Klaxon
  • * Maker
  • Thread Starter
  • Posts: 3556
  • Location: Dallas-ish
  • King of All Klaxon Sciences and Cable Makery
    • Buy stuff

Offline HoffmanMyster

  • HOFF, smol MAN OF MYSTERY
  • * Senior Moderator
  • Posts: 10727
  • Location: WI
Re: The Living Soldering Thread
« Reply #131 on: Wed, 08 May 2013, 16:58:04 »
Just ordered a Hakko FX-888D.  Seems like a solid machine, despite looking a bit like a toy.

Offline tjcaustin

  • King Klaxon
  • * Maker
  • Thread Starter
  • Posts: 3556
  • Location: Dallas-ish
  • King of All Klaxon Sciences and Cable Makery
    • Buy stuff
Re: The Living Soldering Thread
« Reply #132 on: Wed, 08 May 2013, 17:00:29 »

Offline mkawa

  •  No Marketplace Access
  • Posts: 6562
  • (ツ)@@@. crankypants
Re: The Living Soldering Thread
« Reply #133 on: Wed, 08 May 2013, 17:20:15 »
regular 888 is an excellent station, the best hobbyist station that's been released in the last 20 years. i expect the 888d to only be better (calibration, their n2 pseudo-hot-air prework unit, etc)...

to all the brilliant friends who have left us, and all the students who climb on their shoulders.

Offline HoffmanMyster

  • HOFF, smol MAN OF MYSTERY
  • * Senior Moderator
  • Posts: 10727
  • Location: WI
Re: The Living Soldering Thread
« Reply #134 on: Wed, 08 May 2013, 19:49:25 »
Just ordered a Hakko FX-888D.  Seems like a solid machine, despite looking a bit like a toy.


AMG!

SHAMELESS SELF-PLUG:


High quality soldering gear available here at a bargain price ;)

^

Are you posting that because I should have gotten BroCaps' deal?  I definitely wanted to, but he wanted 325 for the whole set and wouldn't split it up.  Nothing wrong with that, I just don't have cash like that with all these keyboards I've been buying.  :P

Offline tjcaustin

  • King Klaxon
  • * Maker
  • Thread Starter
  • Posts: 3556
  • Location: Dallas-ish
  • King of All Klaxon Sciences and Cable Makery
    • Buy stuff
Re: The Living Soldering Thread
« Reply #135 on: Wed, 08 May 2013, 20:16:45 »
Well, I bet you could have worked it out with one of the two people that want the desoldering gun.  But that's neither here nor there, enjoy the station.

Offline HoffmanMyster

  • HOFF, smol MAN OF MYSTERY
  • * Senior Moderator
  • Posts: 10727
  • Location: WI
Re: The Living Soldering Thread
« Reply #136 on: Wed, 08 May 2013, 21:11:57 »
Oh, bummer!  Wish I had seen that people wanted the desolderer!  Ahhh well, too late, like you said.

Offline SpAmRaY

  • NOT a Moderator
  • * Certified Spammer
  • Posts: 14668
  • Location: ¯\(°_o)/¯
  • because reasons.......
Re: The Living Soldering Thread
« Reply #137 on: Wed, 08 May 2013, 22:09:20 »
For someone who has never ever even attempted soldering and just wants to get started what do you all recommend as far as initial equipment?

Offline i3oilermaker

  • * Vendor
  • Posts: 2362
  • Location: Chicago
  • techkeys.us
    • TechKeys
Re: The Living Soldering Thread
« Reply #138 on: Wed, 08 May 2013, 22:20:06 »
So I ordered a "Weller WES51 Analog Soldering Station" from amazon and it came in a box that was taped shut.

When I took of the tip, it looked like there was some evidence of usage.  Can anyone confirm if this is normal for a brand new iron?


21545-021547-1

Offline samwisekoi

  • MAWG since 1997
  • * Administrator
  • Posts: 2480
  • Location: Mt. View, California
  • Sorry, moving houses. Be back ASAP.
    • Tweet samwisekoi
Re: The Living Soldering Thread
« Reply #139 on: Wed, 08 May 2013, 22:35:17 »
For someone who has never ever even attempted soldering and just wants to get started what do you all recommend as far as initial equipment?


Me, personally, I'd say a simple 25 watt Weller with a pencil tip, some good rosin-core solder, a sponge and an old VCR.  Maybe a de-soldering bulb too.  Then get some copper wire and maybe some resistors and start soldering stuff together and melting it apart.  Your goal is to make the solder flow like silver without touching it directly with the iron.

Get a little bit of solder on the iron, then touch it to the wire. Then touch the solder to the wire.  At first your solder joints wil be blobby, ugly, and grey.  That is a cold solder joint and you have to melt it away and try again.

This will go on for a while until suddenly you will see the solder flow like a living thing into the spot where you want it.  That is your first good solder joint, and it is really satisfying.  Keep practicing until they always look like that.

Then toss that starter gear into a tool chest and go buy some nice gear.  But go learn with a good-enough little 25 watt Weller.

 - Ron I samwisekoi
I like keyboards and case modding.  Everything about a computer should be silent -- except the KEYBOARD!

'85 IBM F-122/Soarer Keyboard |  Leopold FC200 TKL (Browns) + GH36 Keypad (Browns/Greens) | GH-122 (Whites/Greens) with Nuclear Data Green keycaps in a Unicomp case

Offline SmallFry

  • ** Moderator Emeritus
  • Posts: 3887
  • Location: Wisconsin, USA
  • Leaving 6/15; returning 6/22 or so.
Re: The Living Soldering Thread
« Reply #140 on: Wed, 08 May 2013, 23:56:33 »
So I ordered a "Weller WES51 Analog Soldering Station" from amazon and it came in a box that was taped shut.

When I took of the tip, it looked like there was some evidence of usage.  Can anyone confirm if this is normal for a brand new iron?


(Attachment Link) (Attachment Link)
Appears to be used. I'd wait for another conformation though.

Offline jdcarpe

  • * Curator
  • Posts: 8854
  • Location: Odessa, TX
  • Live long, and prosper.
Re: The Living Soldering Thread
« Reply #141 on: Thu, 09 May 2013, 00:01:07 »
Yeah it looks slightly used to me, too. Someone probably used it to solder a few things, then RMA'd it back to where you bought it.
KMAC :: LZ-GH :: WASD CODE :: WASD v2 :: GH60 :: Alps64 :: JD45 :: IBM Model M :: IBM 4704 "Pingmaster"

http://jd40.info :: http://jd45.info


in memoriam

"When I was a kid, I used to take things apart and never put them back together."

Offline TheQsanity

  • Posts: 1165
  • SmallFry Lovin'
Re: The Living Soldering Thread
« Reply #142 on: Thu, 09 May 2013, 00:10:44 »
Who has a Dremel and knows what grinding tip is used for aluminum? All the stones I have just get clogged up.
SmallFry! <3

Offline TheProfosist

  • Posts: 3671
  • Location: Wisconsin, USA
  • Custom Layouts Only!
Re: The Living Soldering Thread
« Reply #143 on: Thu, 09 May 2013, 04:12:08 »
Never done alu all i know it stainless eat those stones like crazy :(

Offline mkawa

  •  No Marketplace Access
  • Posts: 6562
  • (ツ)@@@. crankypants
Re: The Living Soldering Thread
« Reply #144 on: Thu, 09 May 2013, 08:56:42 »
there's a diamond coated grinding tip in the dremel catalog. it's small though, more of an engraver than a grinder. there's also a slightly larger version that i have, but i don't remember offhand how big it is. nowhere near as big as the stones. since the diamond is just straight up harder than the alu it should last quite a bit longer.

hmmmmmmmm... anyone want to trade an 888 for an 888d? :D i want dat calibration :P

to all the brilliant friends who have left us, and all the students who climb on their shoulders.

Offline metalliqaz

  • * Maker
  • Posts: 4942
  • Location: the Making Stuff subforum
  • Leopold fanboy
Re: The Living Soldering Thread
« Reply #145 on: Thu, 09 May 2013, 08:56:52 »
For someone who has never ever even attempted soldering and just wants to get started what do you all recommend as far as initial equipment?

That's, like, the entire point of this thread dude.  OP!!

Offline SpAmRaY

  • NOT a Moderator
  • * Certified Spammer
  • Posts: 14668
  • Location: ¯\(°_o)/¯
  • because reasons.......
Re: The Living Soldering Thread
« Reply #146 on: Thu, 09 May 2013, 09:13:40 »
For someone who has never ever even attempted soldering and just wants to get started what do you all recommend as far as initial equipment?

That's, like, the entire point of this thread dude.  OP!!


I gotta remember to read the OP more often  ::)

 
For someone who has never ever even attempted soldering and just wants to get started what do you all recommend as far as initial equipment?


Me, personally, I'd say a simple 25 watt Weller with a pencil tip, some good rosin-core solder, a sponge and an old VCR.  Maybe a de-soldering bulb too.  Then get some copper wire and maybe some resistors and start soldering stuff together and melting it apart.  Your goal is to make the solder flow like silver without touching it directly with the iron.

Get a little bit of solder on the iron, then touch it to the wire. Then touch the solder to the wire.  At first your solder joints wil be blobby, ugly, and grey.  That is a cold solder joint and you have to melt it away and try again.

This will go on for a while until suddenly you will see the solder flow like a living thing into the spot where you want it.  That is your first good solder joint, and it is really satisfying.  Keep practicing until they always look like that.

Then toss that starter gear into a tool chest and go buy some nice gear.  But go learn with a good-enough little 25 watt Weller.

 - Ron I samwisekoi

Thanks Ron! I've actually got a cordless phone I might attempt to repair just for kicks, once I get an idea of what I'm doing.  8)

Offline Sai

  • Posts: 820
  • Location: SG
Re: The Living Soldering Thread
« Reply #147 on: Thu, 09 May 2013, 10:10:42 »
For someone who has never ever even attempted soldering and just wants to get started what do you all recommend as far as initial equipment?


Me, personally, I'd say a simple 25 watt Weller with a pencil tip, some good rosin-core solder, a sponge and an old VCR.  Maybe a de-soldering bulb too.  Then get some copper wire and maybe some resistors and start soldering stuff together and melting it apart.  Your goal is to make the solder flow like silver without touching it directly with the iron.

Get a little bit of solder on the iron, then touch it to the wire. Then touch the solder to the wire.  At first your solder joints wil be blobby, ugly, and grey.  That is a cold solder joint and you have to melt it away and try again.

This will go on for a while until suddenly you will see the solder flow like a living thing into the spot where you want it.  That is your first good solder joint, and it is really satisfying.  Keep practicing until they always look like that.

Then toss that starter gear into a tool chest and go buy some nice gear.  But go learn with a good-enough little 25 watt Weller.

 - Ron I samwisekoi

For someone who has never ever even attempted soldering and just wants to get started what do you all recommend as far as initial equipment?


Me, personally, I'd say a simple 25 watt Weller with a pencil tip, some good rosin-core solder, a sponge and an old VCR.  Maybe a de-soldering bulb too.  Then get some copper wire and maybe some resistors and start soldering stuff together and melting it apart.  Your goal is to make the solder flow like silver without touching it directly with the iron.

Get a little bit of solder on the iron, then touch it to the wire. Then touch the solder to the wire.  At first your solder joints wil be blobby, ugly, and grey.  That is a cold solder joint and you have to melt it away and try again.

This will go on for a while until suddenly you will see the solder flow like a living thing into the spot where you want it.  That is your first good solder joint, and it is really satisfying.  Keep practicing until they always look like that.

Then toss that starter gear into a tool chest and go buy some nice gear.  But go learn with a good-enough little 25 watt Weller.

 - Ron I samwisekoi

Thank you Ron. I am going to practice this weekend. :D
- WTB/WTT - Cotton Candy Brobot V2

Offline Internetlad

  • Posts: 710
Re: The Living Soldering Thread
« Reply #148 on: Thu, 09 May 2013, 11:30:07 »
I had read (maybe even in this thread, who knows), that getting an old 2 dollar VCR, etc., at a garage sale, and desoldering a bunch of stuff, then attempting to "fix" it is a good way to get some experience with soldering. Doesn't really net you much, but if you break the VCR who cares.
"Beep . . . Beep . . . Beep" -Sputnik I


Visit the Typing Test and try!

Offline metalliqaz

  • * Maker
  • Posts: 4942
  • Location: the Making Stuff subforum
  • Leopold fanboy
Re: The Living Soldering Thread
« Reply #149 on: Thu, 09 May 2013, 11:58:23 »
Forget the dusty old VCR.  Build a GH60!