Author Topic: Did you ever have a moment where you thought mechanical KBs were overrated?  (Read 5309 times)

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Offline jcoffin1981

  • Posts: 733
Re: Did you ever have a moment where you thought mechanical KBs were overrated?
« Reply #50 on: Sat, 12 September 2020, 00:16:55 »
Oh, yes. Linear switches absolutely, yes. Linear "Speed" switches, double yes!

Findecanor, I actually just posted about this- can you elaborate about the speed switches?  I'm looking to purchase them.
KPB V60 Gateron Browns and Leopold Keycaps.  Poker 3 with Gateron Browns and Poker keycaps.  Poker 3 with Cherry MX Browns, ABS keycaps and white LED's.

Leopold FC660M- my new favorite, right out of the box.

Offline geoken

  • Posts: 2
Re: Did you ever have a moment where you thought mechanical KBs were overrated?
« Reply #51 on: Sat, 12 September 2020, 07:09:07 »
I do feel that theyíre overrated. Reading through these comments, itís seems a lot of it comes from the fact that peopleís experience with rubber domes is whatever $7.99 keyboard their computerís OEM included with their system. I can identify with that, the basic Dell KB that ships with our computers at work is atrocious. Itís keys have 45 degrees of wobble in every direction. There is no tactile feedback, so pressing a key usually means pushing through mush until itís bottomed out.

The last few rubber domes (not including my current topre) I used were the keyboard from the Logitech mk850 combo and a Dell KM7120. The k850 is an ergo that tents up in the middle - meaning the middle keys have longer travel. If you did a blind taste test with someone whoíd never used topre and asked them to hit the F key on that Logitech and a HHKB and guess which one is topre, youíd probably get a 50/50 split. The Dell is a typical laptop style, but the keys have no wobble, it has no pre travel before the tactile event, it has a noticeable low resistance area after the tactile event/actuation, then it has a soft landing that you need to push through before bottoming out. The Dell does all that over a much shorter travel distance than a typical mech, but once you get used to the travel distance and weighting - itís perfectly concievable that you can actuate without bottoming out (something that usually cited as a main benefit of mechs).

For me, the main thing really keeping me on mechs is the configurability and layout choices. If I could get that Dell keyboard I mentioned in a 65% form factor with the ability to fully customize the layout (so basically mirror the capabilities of my hasu fc660c) I would really entertain the idea of using it full time.