Author Topic: Unknown (Unitek?) Keyboard with AT layout  (Read 6678 times)

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Offline Rayndalf

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Unknown (Unitek?) Keyboard with AT layout
« on: Sat, 09 May 2020, 00:47:12 »
The bottom plate and the PC/XT switch looks similar to Unitek boards, but I'm not familiar with the keycaps.
Probably not much of a deal, but the number of bids made me wonder.
https://www.shopgoodwill.com/Item/92488182

Offline Rayndalf

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Re: Unknown (Unitek?) Keyboard with AT layout
« Reply #1 on: Sat, 09 May 2020, 04:12:10 »
Found another very similar board. The keycaps don't match any of the cherry or space invader boards I have, and it doesn't look like Alps either. Thoroughly convinced this isn't really a good find, but now I'm curious.

https://www.ebay.com/itm/Vintage-Unbranded-Clicky-IBM-XT-style-Keyboard/373042045435?
« Last Edit: Sat, 09 May 2020, 04:13:47 by Rayndalf »

Offline beepbloop

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Re: Unknown (Unitek?) Keyboard with AT layout
« Reply #2 on: Mon, 11 May 2020, 19:33:07 »
Looks like a Datacomp DFK-777 but the one with Futaba switches, not Alps.

Offline Rayndalf

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Re: Unknown (Unitek?) Keyboard with AT layout
« Reply #3 on: Mon, 11 May 2020, 20:24:52 »
I think your right I wonder if people actually like Futaba switches or just hoping it might have Alps anyway (the keycaps are definitely the Futaba ones)... it was only a few years ago when 11800s and Wyse boards went for less than this, and those are both have more usable layouts with decent keycaps and great switches.

Offline Maledicted

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  • Location: Wisconsin, United States
Re: Unknown (Unitek?) Keyboard with AT layout
« Reply #4 on: Tue, 12 May 2020, 13:59:53 »
Futaba MA is ... interesting, when all of the switches actually feel right. The problem is that as a rubber mat inside of them ages, it begins to curl, and changes/lessens the tactility. People have come up with crazy ideas to try to fix this without disassembly, but it is a lot of work and doesn't necessarily lead to a good outcome. I followed the suggestion of a thread on deskthority to use a phillips screwdriver to press down on each switch with the weight of my upper body. This would lead to much increased tactility, if it works. It often took me 2-3+ tries per switch, and then there was the chance that the switches would entirely linearize. I was able to unstick some by inverting the board and dropping it onto its face from varying heights, but at least 5 remained linear. That board is still partially assembled because I haven't decided on whether or not I want to try to cut the switches open, fix them, and figure out some way to actually put them back together again. They're held together by plastic rivets, like a Model M plate sandwich, so ... yeah.

Long story short, they're interesting in that they feel and sound kind of like pressing the tops of tiny bottle caps, and have sharper tactility on the upstroke than down. They may not be worth the babysitting though.