Author Topic: Honeywell-Keytronic keyboards  (Read 2798 times)

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Offline Whiskey in the Jar-o

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Honeywell-Keytronic keyboards
« on: Thu, 20 September 2007, 03:53:36 »
Does anybody remember Honeywell keyboards from the mid-90s? I know they are not clicky, heck not even mechanical, but to me they were just about the best membrane keyboard ever. They sold their keyboard business to Keytronic sometime last decade. I used a 1999 model Keytronic ergotouch (??) for about 3 years from 2000. It felt just like a Honeywell. I've seen reports that more recent Keytronics have a much cheaper key-feel. Anyone knows?

Also, I keep seeing references on the web to Hall-effect Honeywell keyboards, yet I've never been able to find anything concrete. Does anyone know anything about them?

Offline fkeidjn

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Honeywell-Keytronic keyboards
« Reply #1 on: Tue, 27 November 2007, 22:18:54 »
I've heard of hall-effect keyboards on Wikipedia, but I've never actually seen one.  There's this article that refers to Honeywell.

As for the old Honeywell rubber-dome keyboards, there's the classic model Keytronic has to offer:

Quote
Now shipping with Ergo Technology. Most keyboards use a standard 55 grams of force required to register every key, Ergo Technology has 5 different levels of force. From 35 grams to 80 grams - that correspond to the strength of the finger that touches the keys. The result is more comfort for your hands.


Now I don't know if this is the keyboard you're actually referring to.  There's also the Eurotech.
Kinesis Keypad - Filco FKBN104M/EB - Unitek space-saver - Acer 6511-TW - Apple Extended II (M3501) - Scorpius M10 - Cherry G80-1800, AT - SGI Granite - vintage Fujitsu - IBM Model M, 101 and mini - Model F, 84-key AT - Dell AT101W - Northgate 101

Offline Whiskey in the Jar-o

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Honeywell-Keytronic keyboards
« Reply #2 on: Wed, 28 November 2007, 01:57:07 »
I've seen this article before - the only reference I found to Honewell hall-effect keyboards. Here's an ancient calculator with hall-effect keys:

http://www.oldcalculatormuseum.com/sperryedc3.html