Author Topic: Good words, and their definitions  (Read 27168 times)

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Offline jamster

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Re: Good words, and their definitions
« Reply #100 on: Thu, 18 February 2021, 19:57:52 »
I agree with you that "value" is an uncountable noun in this context, so preceding it with an indefinite article makes no sense. It's like saying, "a sand". The exceptions would be when using "value" in a programming or mathematical context, e.g. "A variable is assigned a value", or using it in the sense of "principle", e.g. "That is a core value of his beliefs."

Aha, I had not even come across the concept of an "uncountable noun" before, so could not even figure what kind of word "value" was.

That phrase led me to some useful reading about how they are treated, which is clearing this up for me nicely. Thanks!

Offline jamster

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Re: Good words, and their definitions
« Reply #101 on: Tue, 23 February 2021, 02:47:42 »
This is a weird word, which I have never heard anyone use.

Milquetoast, "a timid or feeble person."

Offline fohat.digs

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Re: Good words, and their definitions
« Reply #102 on: Tue, 23 February 2021, 07:43:55 »

which I have never heard anyone use.

Milquetoast


My father used to say that pretty often.
What this shows is that the Republican Party knows, deep down somewhere, that even before Trump they had less than a policy agenda. All they’ve had for the past decade or so is strategy and tactics to suppress the vote, either through extreme gerrymandering or State-level laws. More often than not, as we’re seeing, through both. Without a stated party platform they are left with nothing but the insanity of The Power Grab and The Big Lie. The Party as a whole has, for some twisted logical reason, decided that America no longer needs Democracy. That in the bent and tortured reality Republicans have created for themselves America was never a Democracy, the Founders never intended for the country’s politics or social order to change, that the country’s democratic features would always only extend to wealthy White Christian property owners. They’ve also, collectively, decided that threatening major, multi-billion dollar corporations that employ tens, if not hundreds, of thousands of people worldwide will somehow, for some reason, cower in the corner when State politicians decide to take a few million in subsidies off the table. When faced with hundreds of millions, or even billions, in lost business because The People are voting with their wallet, I know where I’d position my company, and it’s not at the dinner table with Mitch McConnell and his wife.
– **** Scott 2021-04-08

Offline funkmon

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Re: Good words, and their definitions
« Reply #103 on: Tue, 23 February 2021, 08:28:19 »
What's the etymology of milquetoast?

Offline Kavik

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Re: Good words, and their definitions
« Reply #104 on: Tue, 23 February 2021, 16:54:07 »
What's the etymology of milquetoast?

According to Merriam Webster, it's just a reference to a wimpy character in a 1920 or 1930s cartoon.
Maybe they're waiting for gasmasks and latex to get sexy again.

The world has become a weird place.

Offline jamster

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Re: Good words, and their definitions
« Reply #105 on: Tue, 23 February 2021, 19:20:48 »
What's the etymology of milquetoast?

Named after someone who was too shy to ever ask for more than milk and toast for breakfast?

Offline tp4tissue

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Re: Good words, and their definitions
« Reply #106 on: Wed, 24 February 2021, 00:47:02 »
What's the etymology of milquetoast?

Named after someone who was too shy to ever ask for more than milk and toast for breakfast?

Milk is highly carcinogenic and contaminated. It accelerates hormone dependent cancers such as breast / prostate cancer, it also softens Toast.

A person who drinks milk or ingests milk products is surely to become feeble  //etymology