Author Topic: The Fossil Collecting Thread  (Read 7451 times)

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Offline Carcharocles

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The Fossil Collecting Thread
« on: Sat, 30 December 2017, 14:04:04 »
Not tech, but I'm willing to bet it's geeky enough to go here.

Been collecting fossilized shark teeth for well over a decade now. My pride and joy is a 4 inch Carcharocles megalodon lateral, but I've got a lot of these things!

185458-0
My main collection (as of a year or two ago, anyway). The prized meg is that big tooth is that massive one in the bottom left corner. There's a few shell fossils as well, as well as some fake arrowheads my mom found in Iowa (the fossil hunting trail that she found them in was apparently seeded with these things. She was a tad upset when she found out they weren't real, given she walked quarter mile with a cane to find this stuff and has paraparesis).

185460-1
My "Junk teeth." The large serrated tooth on the bottom right was given to a relative. This image is also outdated because the teeth are now organized.

185462-2
Two shark teeth I got a year or so ago, a Galeocerdo contortus and a Galeocerdo mayumbensis. Both are extinct tiger sharks (although the contortus is debatable).

185464-3
My megatooth shark teeth (right two rows) and great white teeth (left two rows.)  Some of the great white teeth belong to a species called Cosmopolitodus hastalis--these would be the ones on the far left, with a transitional tooth at the top. C. hastalis is considered to be the direct ancestor of the modern great white, and many of the broad form teeth are indistinguishable from modern white shark teeth that have worn serrations. The transitional tooth was misidentified as a species known as C. escheri when I bought it, but that species is only found in an isolated area in Eastern Europe and was a dead end; this tooth is instead a partly serrated C. hastalis tooth from Chile, which is where the great white is thought to have first evolved. Penny for size reference.

185466-4
Palaeocarcharodon orientalis. Once thought by some scientists as the ancestor of both the great white and megalodon, it's now considered to be a dead end. This is the second one I owned (the one in the junk teeth pic was the first), but the first was broken by a careless relative. Shame too, as it was a huge tooth in good condition. I have some of its relatives in my main collection.

185468-5
Got this thing for Christmas! A non-repaired Otodus obliquus tooth (megalodon ancestor) in matrix. I have three other Otodus teeth, but they were all bought repaired at a shady local rock shop. Wouldn't be the last time I was ripped off by them, either.

185470-6
Reverse side of the Christmas gift. That's a Cretolamna appendiculata tooth you see at the top--they can only be distinguished from its descendant (Otodus) by size and thickness of the tooth (the latter is handy when you have a juvenile Otodus tooth). C. appendiculata to megalodon are considered by some to be a chronospecies--a single species evolving over years (in this case, a more than 63 million year time span). The same can likely be said of C. hastalis and the modern great white. There's also a broken shark tooth--likely a Scapanorhynchus texanus (possibly goblin shark from that era), but it's hard to see--look on the bottom left of the matrix.

The Christmas fossil was purchased from a dealer (a reliable one I've been user for years--there are few shark teeth in my area, due to me living in an area that is geologically Paleozoic and sparce in outcroppings), who found it themselves and accidentally fractured the third tooth preparing it for exhibit. They dug into their private collection to sell it, actually.
« Last Edit: Sat, 30 December 2017, 14:09:54 by Carcharocles »
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Offline fohat.digs

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Re: The Fossil Collecting Thread
« Reply #1 on: Sat, 30 December 2017, 15:22:30 »
This is wicked awesome. Thanks for sharing it with us!
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No, it's not your job. But you think it is. And video last night shows him walking around roaming around with the assault rifle not really doing much of protecting anything." Figliuzzi made it clear that calling these characters "troubled" is a misnomer. "I would assert," Figliuzzi continued. "that it's time we stopped using the word ‘troubled’ with regard to white young people who act out like this and start thinking about the radicalized term that we used when people of color or people of Islamic faith act out like this. This is a radicalization process that's happening. It happened with the El Paso shooter in Texas. We kept hearing he was troubled. No, he was radicalized. And it's happening online."

Offline noisyturtle

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Re: The Fossil Collecting Thread
« Reply #2 on: Sun, 31 December 2017, 17:19:48 »
Hmm I learned some things, ty for sharing.

Offline rowdy

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Re: The Fossil Collecting Thread
« Reply #3 on: Mon, 01 January 2018, 23:42:51 »
That's, perhaps, a little creepy, but an awesome collection!

I wouldn't even know where to begin looking for items like that over here.
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Offline corygrapher

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Re: The Fossil Collecting Thread
« Reply #4 on: Fri, 05 January 2018, 23:25:53 »
Really impressive. Thank you for sharing.

Offline ander

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Re: The Fossil Collecting Thread
« Reply #5 on: Mon, 15 January 2018, 17:37:07 »
...I wouldn't even know where to begin looking for items like that over here.

Why dude, you're being far too modest re your distinguished landmass. According to the government's Australia's Fossil Past site:

Quote
Because of its relative isolation over millennia, Australia has a rich, unique fossil record, dating from approximately 3.2 billion years ago, close to when the Earth was stabilising its formation. Since separation of the former continent Gondwana, an almost continuous record of the distant past is present in Australia today.

(You should imagine someone saying that in an Oz accent.)

As to where said fossils are actually found, you need go no further than the Australian Museum's Fossil sites of Australia page.

Of course when you find fossils, they'll be upside-down like everything else there, so please turn them right-side-up before photographing them.

Personally, I needn't collect fossils, as I am one.
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Offline rowdy

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Re: The Fossil Collecting Thread
« Reply #6 on: Mon, 15 January 2018, 20:01:04 »
...I wouldn't even know where to begin looking for items like that over here.

Why dude, you're being far too modest re your distinguished landmass. According to the government's Australia's Fossil Past site:

Quote
Because of its relative isolation over millennia, Australia has a rich, unique fossil record, dating from approximately 3.2 billion years ago, close to when the Earth was stabilising its formation. Since separation of the former continent Gondwana, an almost continuous record of the distant past is present in Australia today.

(You should imagine someone saying that in an Oz accent.)

As to where said fossils are actually found, you need go no further than the Australian Museum's Fossil sites of Australia page.

Of course when you find fossils, they'll be upside-down like everything else there, so please turn them right-side-up before photographing them.

Personally, I needn't collect fossils, as I am one.

Victoria is notably absent.
"Because keyboards are accessories to PC makers, they focus on minimizing the manufacturing costs. But that’s incorrect. It’s in HHKB’s slogan, but when America’s cowboys were in the middle of a trip and their horse died, they would leave the horse there. But even if they were in the middle of a desert, they would take their saddle with them. The horse was a consumable good, but the saddle was an interface that their bodies had gotten used to. In the same vein, PCs are consumable goods, while keyboards are important interfaces." - Eiiti Wada

NEC APC-H4100E | Ducky DK9008 Shine MX blue LED red | Ducky DK9008 Shine MX blue LED green | Link 900243-08 | CM QFR MX black | KeyCool 87 white MX reds | HHKB 2 Pro | Model M 02-Mar-1993 | Model M 29-Nov-1995 | CM Trigger (broken) | CM QFS MX green | Ducky DK9087 Shine 3 TKL Yellow Edition MX black | Lexmark SSK 21-Apr-1994 | IBM SSK 13-Oct-1987 | CODE TKL MX clear | Model M 122 01-Jun-1988

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Offline Carcharocles

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Re: The Fossil Collecting Thread
« Reply #7 on: Tue, 16 January 2018, 21:32:33 »
You'll only find shark teeth in places that were once under an ocean. This means mostly coastal regions for teeth from the Cenozoic, and larger areas like the American Midwest for middle Cretaceous or earlier. You probably shouldn't count on anything from earlier than the Cretaceous though--the further back you go, the less likely smaller fossils like shark teeth will remain preserved. I'm not sure, but I don't think much of Australia has ever been underwater.

Unfortunately I live in the Kansas City area, which is largely Pennsylvanian rock--well before true sharks were abundant enough for the teeth to be common--so I don't usually hunt for my teeth. Typically, I order off websites like http://www.lowcountrygeologic.com/. In most states here, shark teeth are lumped with invertebrates as being overly common, so I don't need to worry about legalities when I buy them (or, for that matter, interfering with science). However, if you don't know your local laws, always check with them before buying or importing fossils of any type.

Meanwhile, have a look at the "junk teeth," now properly arranged:
186691-0
« Last Edit: Tue, 16 January 2018, 21:46:43 by Carcharocles »
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Offline Carcharocles

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Re: The Fossil Collecting Thread
« Reply #8 on: Sun, 12 August 2018, 03:44:27 »
Speaking of Victoria, an amazing find happened there recently. Apparently a man on a stroll managed to stumble upon a near complete dentition (set of teeth from the same shark) of Carcharocles angustidens, one of the ancestors of megalodon. He also found a number of Hexanchus (six gill shark) teeth as well.

https://www.insideedition.com/australia-man-finds-fossils-ancient-megatooth-shark-twice-size-great-white-45878
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Offline suicidal_orange

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Re: The Fossil Collecting Thread
« Reply #9 on: Sun, 12 August 2018, 04:59:33 »
What an interesting collection, thanks for sharing.

You have no excuses now rowdy, get down to the beach and find some teeth! :))
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Offline fohat.digs

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Re: The Fossil Collecting Thread
« Reply #10 on: Sun, 12 August 2018, 08:29:26 »

Speaking of Victoria, an amazing find happened there recently. Apparently a man on a stroll managed to stumble upon a near complete dentition (set of teeth from the same shark) of Carcharocles angustidens


I saw that the other day. Cool! I was quite impressed when they said that it fed on small whales.
The difference in characterization of crime and who commits it skews what criminality looks like demographically. "What we're seeing so far is very similar to the process that we see with Islamic violent Jihad radicalization," said former FBI Assistant Director Frank Figliuzzi, "This wanting to belong to a cause greater than yourself, wanting to get affirmation from a group who may not even know who you are or ever met you. And then feeling like you're part of this deployment, this cause. You heard him say on the clip 'It's my job to protect this.'
No, it's not your job. But you think it is. And video last night shows him walking around roaming around with the assault rifle not really doing much of protecting anything." Figliuzzi made it clear that calling these characters "troubled" is a misnomer. "I would assert," Figliuzzi continued. "that it's time we stopped using the word ‘troubled’ with regard to white young people who act out like this and start thinking about the radicalized term that we used when people of color or people of Islamic faith act out like this. This is a radicalization process that's happening. It happened with the El Paso shooter in Texas. We kept hearing he was troubled. No, he was radicalized. And it's happening online."

Offline csmertx

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Re: The Fossil Collecting Thread
« Reply #11 on: Sun, 12 August 2018, 11:09:56 »
I use to find shark teeth in shallow streams of north central florida. The stream beds around here are filthy with tiny teeth (met one guy that was a serious hunter; cool dude). Absolutely geek worthy :)
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Offline Carcharocles

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Re: The Fossil Collecting Thread
« Reply #12 on: Sun, 12 August 2018, 20:46:53 »
I use to find shark teeth in shallow streams of north central florida. The stream beds around here are filthy with tiny teeth (met one guy that was a serious hunter; cool dude). Absolutely geek worthy :)

That's because, until a dozen or so million years ago, the peninsula part of Florida was underwater.

See that box with the jumbled mess of mostly broken teeth and ray plates? Almost all of those were found in two bags of mud and gravel a guy in Florida sent me. I only had to pay shipping for it, he scooped them up. My mom and I spent hours that day going through the stuff, with a bucket of water and a sifter. We split the winnings 50/50; most of hers are in storage.
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Offline csmertx

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Re: The Fossil Collecting Thread
« Reply #13 on: Sun, 12 August 2018, 21:50:41 »
I use to find shark teeth in shallow streams of north central florida. The stream beds around here are filthy with tiny teeth (met one guy that was a serious hunter; cool dude). Absolutely geek worthy :)

That's because, until a dozen or so million years ago, the peninsula part of Florida was underwater.

See that box with the jumbled mess of mostly broken teeth and ray plates? Almost all of those were found in two bags of mud and gravel a guy in Florida sent me. I only had to pay shipping for it, he scooped them up. My mom and I spent hours that day going through the stuff, with a bucket of water and a sifter. We split the winnings 50/50; most of hers are in storage.

Holy frijoles, 2002 kinda feels like millions of years ago now that you mention it. I like the collision theory of Theia and Gaia myself. Sometimes I wonder how that might have affected Pangea. Anyway, surface level streams are fine for stones, but the stream beds that cut through small hills (5-15ft walls) are the ones you might want to check out if you ever get the chance. You might even run into that old (older than me anyway) hippy if he's still out hunting for shark teeth. The tiny ones in that jumbled up mess of a box are about the size of the ones my friends and I would find. One could find the spots fairly easily these days with satellite imagery.

@rowdy - happy hunting  :thumb:
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Offline Ephemeral

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Re: The Fossil Collecting Thread
« Reply #14 on: Wed, 15 August 2018, 11:32:24 »
Not tech, but I'm willing to bet it's geeky enough to go here.

Interesting to see, but definitely welcome!

When I was a kid I was fascinated with Jurassic Park. Naturally I wanted to be a paleontologist.
I was lucky enough to meet and befriend a handful of paleontologists at a local museum that had a stellar "Dinosphere" exhibit.
Once when they cycled what they had on display, they gave me this fossilized egg.
Unfortunately for the life of me I cannot remember what species the egg belonged to because this was so long ago, but enjoy the image anyway. I'm sure someone will find it interesting nonetheless. :D

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Offline tp4tissue

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Re: The Fossil Collecting Thread
« Reply #15 on: Wed, 15 August 2018, 16:19:03 »
Not tech, but I'm willing to bet it's geeky enough to go here.

Interesting to see, but definitely welcome!

When I was a kid I was fascinated with Jurassic Park. Naturally I wanted to be a paleontologist.
I was lucky enough to meet and befriend a handful of paleontologists at a local museum that had a stellar "Dinosphere" exhibit.
Once when they cycled what they had on display, they gave me this fossilized egg.
Unfortunately for the life of me I cannot remember what species the egg belonged to because this was so long ago, but enjoy the image anyway. I'm sure someone will find it interesting nonetheless. :D

(Attachment Link)



Bring it next time to the dentist have them xray it.