Author Topic: Good words, and their definitions  (Read 26433 times)

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Offline jamster

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Re: Good words, and their definitions
« Reply #100 on: Thu, 18 February 2021, 19:57:52 »
I agree with you that "value" is an uncountable noun in this context, so preceding it with an indefinite article makes no sense. It's like saying, "a sand". The exceptions would be when using "value" in a programming or mathematical context, e.g. "A variable is assigned a value", or using it in the sense of "principle", e.g. "That is a core value of his beliefs."

Aha, I had not even come across the concept of an "uncountable noun" before, so could not even figure what kind of word "value" was.

That phrase led me to some useful reading about how they are treated, which is clearing this up for me nicely. Thanks!

Offline jamster

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Re: Good words, and their definitions
« Reply #101 on: Tue, 23 February 2021, 02:47:42 »
This is a weird word, which I have never heard anyone use.

Milquetoast, "a timid or feeble person."

Offline fohat.digs

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Re: Good words, and their definitions
« Reply #102 on: Tue, 23 February 2021, 07:43:55 »

which I have never heard anyone use.

Milquetoast


My father used to say that pretty often.
The problem is deeper than reporters asking tough questions of both sides, but the view of politics these questions reflect. Simply put, this view is the one that Trump rode to victory on and built his cult with.
Democrats and progressives want politics to be about policies that will help Americans and solve problems; Trumpists want to make politics about lies, insults, personalities and tribal warfare, so that the American people continue to believe that politics is just a sideshow that has nothing to do with their lives.
Journalists should hold politicians accountable on both sides of the aisle, but they should do so in substantive ways, not by asking irrelevant questions that look more like gotcha oppo research than substantive questions about policy. At a deeper level, the choices that journalists and media companies make right now will have an important impact on whether we as a nation are able to rise from the destruction of January 6th to revitalize our democracy, or to slide helplessly into fascism.
– “Arizona Blues” 2021

Offline funkmon

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Re: Good words, and their definitions
« Reply #103 on: Tue, 23 February 2021, 08:28:19 »
What's the etymology of milquetoast?

Offline Kavik

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Re: Good words, and their definitions
« Reply #104 on: Tue, 23 February 2021, 16:54:07 »
What's the etymology of milquetoast?

According to Merriam Webster, it's just a reference to a wimpy character in a 1920 or 1930s cartoon.
Maybe they're waiting for gasmasks and latex to get sexy again.

The world has become a weird place.

Offline jamster

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Re: Good words, and their definitions
« Reply #105 on: Tue, 23 February 2021, 19:20:48 »
What's the etymology of milquetoast?

Named after someone who was too shy to ever ask for more than milk and toast for breakfast?

Offline tp4tissue

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Re: Good words, and their definitions
« Reply #106 on: Wed, 24 February 2021, 00:47:02 »
What's the etymology of milquetoast?

Named after someone who was too shy to ever ask for more than milk and toast for breakfast?

Milk is highly carcinogenic and contaminated. It accelerates hormone dependent cancers such as breast / prostate cancer, it also softens Toast.

A person who drinks milk or ingests milk products is surely to become feeble  //etymology