Author Topic: Mental Health  (Read 1231 times)

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Offline Shapey Fiend

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Mental Health
« on: Fri, 12 October 2018, 20:14:26 »
Massive respect to all those going through hard times, and I'd make this sort of post on social media except I'd feel conscious of people I know reading it, but dealing with people have mental health issues can be incredibly challenging. I was just outside the bar with an incredibly unwell, paranoid lad who beat my mate Sean to a pulp, Sean's been walking around anxious all evening talking about trying to deescalate the situation, other guy was tensed head to toe, yelling in my face threatening to hit me if I didn't back off no stand down at all.

I lived with someone for 4 years got like this about pretty much everything. It's bloody exhausting dealing with this level of delusion. Certainly not as bad as being mentally ill cos (at least for me) I got out of that environment and felt instantly relieved and didn't have serious condition following me, but it's no joke at the same time.

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Re: Mental Health
« Reply #1 on: Fri, 12 October 2018, 20:40:30 »
Not every person is --All There--.

If you lack the resource to help them, or you simply don't want to.. Best keep your distance.



The ill are people, they deserve kindness and help, but not everyone is equipped to extend that hand..

Offline Shapey Fiend

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Re: Mental Health
« Reply #2 on: Fri, 12 October 2018, 21:29:26 »
Conscious of oversharing. Only reason I was in it so long cos there was a child involved which I was worried about having some custody of. He's been living with me for the last two years, and situation between me and his mother way more settled than when I was doing everything trying to compensate, which makes very little sense to me even now. Cutting ties is not my style. Worked out a thousand times better. Dealing with people have mad trauma is very counter intuitive.

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Re: Mental Health
« Reply #3 on: Fri, 12 October 2018, 21:34:03 »
Conscious of oversharing. Only reason I was in it so long cos there was a child involved which I was worried about having some custody of. He's been living with me for the last two years, and situation between me and his mother way more settled than when I was doing everything trying to compensate, which makes very little sense to me even now. Cutting ties is not my style. Worked out a thousand times better. Dealing with people have mad trauma is very counter intuitive.

It seems you've worked it out well..

It's never an issue of good vs evil,   do the people involved have the right specifications to co-exist..  If not,  detach disk and go separate ways..

Offline Carcharocles

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Re: Mental Health
« Reply #4 on: Sat, 13 October 2018, 00:18:39 »
As a person suffering from a psychotic disorder, allow me to point out that the case your encounter is not typical of mental illness. For most mental illnesses--psychosis included, which paranoia is often a symptom of--the individual is not significantly more likely to be violent than the average "normal" human being. There is no reason to keep your distance from them--in fact, the mentally ill are so used to being treated subhuman, they're far more likely to distance themselves from you.

Now when it comes to certain personality disorders--antisocial personality disorder in particular--those people are considerably more likely to be violent. But personality disorders are their own thing--they're mental illness, but the don't really fit well with other disorders. For example, antisocial personality disorder--also known as sociopathy or psychopathy in extreme cases--causes the individual to have a greatly reduced amount of empathy, poor ability to think ahead and the inability to feel remorse or learn from their actions. However, even these individuals are not always violent or even criminals--many psychologists believe that a high functioning sociopath is more likely to succeed in business or politics than a person who is capable of grasping that other people exist and matter. In fact, I'd wager a good portion of the world's political leaders are sociopaths (or narcissists); most psychologists tend to agree with that figure.

Now there are symptoms that can mimic sociopathy in the mentally ill. Persons with schizophrenia may suffer from flat affect, which makes them have difficulty expressing emotion (or flat out be unable to). These people will feel numb and indifferent to others in severe cases, but it's distinguished from true lack of empathy in that they are simply unaware of others' feelings, rather than disregarding them.

I do want to point out that while your experience is hardly typical or even common, it does happen. There's a way to tell if the situation might go that way though: look at their past behavior, particularly any behavior before their illness developed (mental illness by and large being something that develops rather than a birth defect)--if they have reacted to stress with violent outbursts in the past, they will likely do so again. Do keep in mind though that some circumstances are more likely to cause a mentally ill person to lash out--attempting to restrain them or otherwise "closing them in" is a very bad idea, as it provokes a fight or flight response. If the person you are talking to is not immediately violent or aggressive and asks to be left alone, do it. If you are worried about them hurting themselves, someone else or getting hurt, call their doctor or psychiatrist.

And always, always remember that even though voices or other hallucinations are not real to you, they are very much real to the patient. This is the same with any disease, mental or physical--tell an individual who is sick or suffering that any symptom isn't real, is in their heads or that they are crazy is just going to make them feel unimportant at best (leading to a risk of self destructive behavior), or outright p*** them off at worst. If a person (whose past behavior you are familiar with and/or trusts you) starts having this kind of symptom and needs to be reassured, tell them they are hallucinating instead. There's a big difference between "Okay, you're hallucinating. I need you to take a deep breath and try to relax, and we can get through this" and "It's all in your head. I need you to take a deep breath and try to relax, and we can get through this."

Remember, if you deliberately antagonize or isolate a mentally ill person, treat them like they're crud/subhuman or walk on tiptoes around them, that's just going to upset them. I mean, you wouldn't do that to a person without a mental illness--it would just be insulting. I've been in situations myself where people who didn't know better attempted to isolate me because they thought psychotic meant dangerous. It frightened me--my immediate response was to flee to a more caring individual, only to be grabbed by the arm and yanked into a room where the very people who had isolated me blocked the doors with their bodies. To say that the situation went to h*** and a hand basket would be an understatement. Had they simply had one person stay with me and attempt to be understanding and another call my mother and my psychiatrist, the whole incident could have been avoided. The only good thing that came from it was that I was hospitalized and correctly diagnosed (I had been labeled as ADHD at the time, and was over medicated for it. That in itself probably didn't help).
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Re: Mental Health
« Reply #5 on: Sat, 13 October 2018, 05:24:18 »
The whole incident could have been avoided. The only good thing that came from it was that I was hospitalized and correctly diagnosed (I had been labeled as ADHD at the time, and was over medicated for it. That in itself probably didn't help).


This is a major issue with DSM and psych in general..

The big book was bound PRIOR to psychologists having the tools to look INTO the physical brain.

Much of it is just observation of behavior from the outside.  This is the same reason why one could so easily make a diagnosis for simply someone having a bad day.  The same engine can make very similar squeaking sound for 2 very different reasons, you wouldn't ever know what was going on until you pop the hood. That didn't happen until VERY recently.

This is why so many of the descriptions of disorders sound like each other, and they struggled greatly to make distinctions.

But the field is rapidly changing, we are now discovering more specific traits and whole categories are being rewritten because of the new tech which can see the physical // operational differences in the brains of affected individuals.


PRIOR to ~ 10-15 yrs back,  pharmacon was merely having a field day with pill prescriptions. Much of it does more harm than good.

Common example,  ADHD,  young people running around, can't focus on schoolwork, jumping up and down because they have a high power to weight ratio..

Pharmacon said, hey, let's give these guys amphetamines, stuff wurked great during wwii, Churchill took it.. It makes them concentrate, and dampens spontaneity, look at him, quiet. Once they're on amphetamines they'll become life time subscribers because it disrupts their receptor counts such that eventually they can't function without it.

How many young people can't pay attention to school without significant parental guidance, pretty much all of them.. Through that oversight an entire generation was born into households which substituted medication for the effort of tedious parenting.

Between DSM 4 and 5,  there is a 5 year difference in diagnosis of ADHD onset.. 5 years.. why, because now they can sell you more pills..

The DSM was designed by the drug companies and for the drug companies to legitimize their pill prescriptions..


Offline typo

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Re: Mental Health
« Reply #6 on: Mon, 15 October 2018, 02:37:50 »
I am old and have Parkinson's but my mind is okay. even though I am Wry. Someone in my life is bananas. It is very difficult to deal with. Not violent in this case. Just a babbling brook. It is very hard to have conversations with this person. It tests my own sanity.

As usual, true TP. Big Pharma is worse than Big Tobacco. I think medication ads on TV is out of line.

Online Findecanor

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Re: Mental Health
« Reply #7 on: Mon, 15 October 2018, 02:53:50 »
Previously, I have had my sister living with me for several years and her varying moods have been difficult to deal with. Sometimes very aggressive, other times seclusive. I suspected that she is bipolar but I don't know if she has been diagnosed as such. Our grandmother had been diagnosed as bipolar and there is supposedly a hereditary component.

I was just outside the bar with an incredibly unwell, paranoid lad who beat my mate Sean to a pulp, Sean's been walking around anxious all evening talking about trying to deescalate the situation, other guy was tensed head to toe, yelling in my face threatening to hit me if I didn't back off no stand down at all.
My first thought is that the violent guy might have been on steroids. Those tend to make their users more aggressive.
« Last Edit: Mon, 15 October 2018, 03:01:40 by Findecanor »
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