Author Topic: Considering Ergodox EZ  (Read 1810 times)

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Offline phinix

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Considering Ergodox EZ
« on: Thu, 16 January 2020, 05:05:43 »
Hey guys.
For my whole life I've been using TKL keyboards.
Lately, I looked at ergo keyboards and really liked the look and functionality of Ergodox EZ.

Would you suggest Ergodox EZ as a first ergo board?
I would prefer to buy it as a barebone and add my won switches and caps. In the shop it doesn't let me buy it without them...

Can Ergodox EZ users please let me know your opinions on that setup?
Pros and cons.
Also, is it hard to switch to ortholinear?
I have never used ergo boards, but have a feeling that tinted keyboard will feel amazing, not sure about split, but maybe as well?

(pt4, I hope you will chime in as our ergo lover ;))
« Last Edit: Thu, 16 January 2020, 05:26:24 by phinix »
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Offline Findecanor

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Re: Considering Ergodox EZ
« Reply #1 on: Thu, 16 January 2020, 08:27:36 »
The ErgoDox had been developed by Dox and bpihany on this board, with input from the community and the design released as Open Source. Most ErgoDoxen in the beginning were sold as DIY kits, and several companies still sell loose PCBs and/or cases.
ErgoDox EZ is more or less that design pre-assembled with a fancier case and warranty.

A more recent clone (same layout but not 100% compatible with other parts) is the Hot Dox. Everything on it comes soldered except switches, which fit in Kailh hotswapping-sockets. There is a barebones option that I think would fit what you are looking for.

The ErgoDox is merely "columnar", not "ortholinear": the columns are somewhat shifted against one-another; rows and columns are not orthogonal to one-another.
There are a few DIY keyboards that do look a lot like the ErgoDox except that they do have ortholinear alphanumeric keys, and you might have seen some of those somewhere too.
There are lots of other DIY columnar ergo keyboards out there that are more or less inspired by the ErgoDox and many of them are attempts to improve on the ErgoDox's thumb section: it has been criticised for having the thumb-keys too far out for small to medium-sized hands.

Learning to type on a columnar keyboard is easiest if you already know how to touch-type according to the method.
« Last Edit: Tue, 21 January 2020, 04:30:35 by Findecanor »
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Offline phinix

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Re: Considering Ergodox EZ
« Reply #2 on: Fri, 17 January 2020, 07:36:29 »
The ErgoDox had been developed by Dox and bpihany on this board, with input from the community and the design released as Open Source. Most ErgoDoxen in the beginning were sold as DIY kits, and several companies still sell loose PCBs and/or cases.
ErgoDox EZ is more or less that design pre-assembled with a fancier case and warranty.

A more recent clone (same layout but not 100% compatible with other parts) is the Hot Dox. Everything on it comes soldered except switches, which fit in Kailh hotswapping-sockets. There is a barebones option that I think would fit what you are looking for.

The ErgoDox is merely "columnar", not "ortholinear": the columns are somewhat shifted against one-another; rows and columns are not orthogonal to one-another.
There are a few DIY keyboards that do look a lot like the ErgoDox except that they have ortholinear alphanumeric keys, and you might have seen some somewhere.
There are lots of other DIY columnar ergo keyboards out there that are more or less inspired by the ErgoDox and many of them are attempts to improve on the ErgoDox's thumb section: it has been criticised for having the thumb-keys too far out for small to medium-sized hands.

Learning to type on a columnar keyboard is easiest if you already know how to touch-type according to the method.

Aah, thanks for this introduction to world of ergodox:), explains a lot.

I'm a bit scared to try these out, spend lot of money and end up with it not being able to get used to it.
How long does it take to learn touch type on these?
7500 | 1080Ti | 2x 1TB SSD | Z270 ITX | 16GB RAM | SFX 600W | Philips 40" 4K BDM4065UC | Cooltek UMX1
Realforce R2 55g Novatouched | Realforce 87U 55 | Model M | Logitech MX518 Legend | X52 PRO
SA: Carbon, Penumbra, 7bit's Round6, Amber Screen Cherry: OG double shot XDA: Canvas MDA: Big Bone

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Offline ergonaut

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Re: Considering Ergodox EZ
« Reply #3 on: Tue, 21 January 2020, 04:04:50 »
If you already touch-type properly and use the new board exclusively, it shouldn’t take long. I switched from regular boards first to the MS Sculpt (which is split, but otherwise normal) and then to the Kinesis Advantage. The switch to the Sculpt was totally painless, the switch to the Kinesis (which should be comparable to the Ergodox) slowed me down a little for the first ten days or so (because I had to correct more mistakes), but I could use it in the office right away.

Things might be different if your job depends on being able to type lightning-fast all day, but whose job does? In such a case, it might be a good idea to practice with the new board during vacation or your free time before bringing it to work.

Offline phinix

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Re: Considering Ergodox EZ
« Reply #4 on: Tue, 21 January 2020, 04:12:06 »
If you already touch-type properly and use the new board exclusively, it shouldn’t take long. I switched from regular boards first to the MS Sculpt (which is split, but otherwise normal) and then to the Kinesis Advantage. The switch to the Sculpt was totally painless, the switch to the Kinesis (which should be comparable to the Ergodox) slowed me down a little for the first ten days or so (because I had to correct more mistakes), but I could use it in the office right away.

Things might be different if your job depends on being able to type lightning-fast all day, but whose job does? In such a case, it might be a good idea to practice with the new board during vacation or your free time before bringing it to work.

I don't touch type, that's the thing. It may take time to learn it on Ergodox.
You're right, I would definitely need to practice at home before bringing it to work.
7500 | 1080Ti | 2x 1TB SSD | Z270 ITX | 16GB RAM | SFX 600W | Philips 40" 4K BDM4065UC | Cooltek UMX1
Realforce R2 55g Novatouched | Realforce 87U 55 | Model M | Logitech MX518 Legend | X52 PRO
SA: Carbon, Penumbra, 7bit's Round6, Amber Screen Cherry: OG double shot XDA: Canvas MDA: Big Bone

 ::: Phinix Cube ::: Phinix Nano Tower ::: Phinix Aurora ::: Phinix Chimera ::: Phinix Retro :::
star citizen :::  CMDR Phinix 325A LTI

Offline ergonaut

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Re: Considering Ergodox EZ
« Reply #5 on: Tue, 21 January 2020, 04:51:18 »
If you don’t touch type, the Ergodox (or any ortholinear or column-staggered board) may be a good choice to learn on, because every key on the top and bottom rows is directly above/below a key on the home row. That might make it easier to remember where everything is. When I learned touch typing, I taped a printout of the keyboard layout to my screen, so I didn’t have to look at the keys, I can recommend that approach.