Author Topic: COFFEE THREAD  (Read 44203 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline dingusxmcgee

  • Posts: 94
  • Location: West MI
Re: COFFEE THREAD
« Reply #250 on: Sun, 10 May 2020, 17:54:12 »


NEVER put beans in the freezer.

I mean, James Hoffman, a former WBC winner, stated in one of his coffee brewing videos that if you don't plan on using your coffee for 2 weeks or more (i.e. vacation), you can vacuum seal for storage and place in a freezer of up to 2-3 months.
[/quote]
Don’t even have to vacuum seal according to that video.

I did that recently, bought two 12oz bags, froze one in a generic freezer zip loc bag that I “smooshed” the air out of and used the other. Took the frozen bag out after about 1.5-2weeks and let it sit over night. Used it the next day, tasted great.

Obviously that’s a short time frame but It works perfectly for my needs.

Offline romevi

  • Formerly romevi
  • * Exalted Elder
  • Posts: 8926
  • Location: The Windy City
Re: COFFEE THREAD
« Reply #251 on: Sun, 10 May 2020, 18:35:27 »
Put a quarter teaspoon of salt in every 6 tablespoons of coffee.

Offline noisyturtle

  • * Exalted Elder
  • Posts: 5961
  • comfortably numb
Re: COFFEE THREAD
« Reply #252 on: Sun, 10 May 2020, 18:39:04 »
NEVER put beans in the freezer.


I mean, James Hoffman, a former WBC winner, stated in one of his coffee brewing videos that if you don't plan on using your coffee for 2 weeks or more (i.e. vacation), you can vacuum seal for storage and place in a freezer of up to 2-3 months.

If you NEED to, but it won't by any means taste as good as fresh ground. Putting beans in the freezer screws up the oils in the bean. All the moisture in the bean gets constantly frozen and defrosted, not good for the product. Coffee isn't like wine.

Grinding them then freezing it is possibly the most disruptive thing you can do to beans.

Offline dingusxmcgee

  • Posts: 94
  • Location: West MI
Re: COFFEE THREAD
« Reply #253 on: Sun, 10 May 2020, 18:52:45 »
NEVER put beans in the freezer.


I mean, James Hoffman, a former WBC winner, stated in one of his coffee brewing videos that if you don't plan on using your coffee for 2 weeks or more (i.e. vacation), you can vacuum seal for storage and place in a freezer of up to 2-3 months.

If you NEED to, but it won't by any means taste as good as fresh ground. Putting beans in the freezer screws up the oils in the bean. All the moisture in the bean gets constantly frozen and defrosted, not good for the product. Coffee isn't like wine.

Grinding them then freezing it is possibly the most disruptive thing you can do to beans.
One of the key points in the Hoffman video is not to interact with the beans when they are frozen, don’t open them up to get some etc.

Freeze an unopened bag and take it out when you will use the WHOLE bag. Don’t re-freeze.

The other way around I totally agree. Not a good idea to introduce humidity etc all the time to frozen beans.

Offline IronCheeks

  • Posts: 40
  • Location: NYC
Re: COFFEE THREAD
« Reply #254 on: Sun, 10 May 2020, 20:16:12 »
NEVER put beans in the freezer.


I mean, James Hoffman, a former WBC winner, stated in one of his coffee brewing videos that if you don't plan on using your coffee for 2 weeks or more (i.e. vacation), you can vacuum seal for storage and place in a freezer of up to 2-3 months.

If you NEED to, but it won't by any means taste as good as fresh ground. Putting beans in the freezer screws up the oils in the bean. All the moisture in the bean gets constantly frozen and defrosted, not good for the product. Coffee isn't like wine.

Grinding them then freezing it is possibly the most disruptive thing you can do to beans.
One of the key points in the Hoffman video is not to interact with the beans when they are frozen, don’t open them up to get some etc.

Freeze an unopened bag and take it out when you will use the WHOLE bag. Don’t re-freeze.

The other way around I totally agree. Not a good idea to introduce humidity etc all the time to frozen beans.

That makes sense, especially when the bloom essentially loses all its potential to open up the coffee. So, I guess for super-long term storage, but not for regular every-day stowaway.



Offline sugar.tea.milk

  • Posts: 8
Re: COFFEE THREAD
« Reply #255 on: Sun, 10 May 2020, 20:22:28 »
I buy my coffee at an organic shop. Grind it there and put it in a glass jar  :-*

How long, very roughly, do you guys think fresh coffee grains, once grinded, stay fresh?  Ain't it better to always brew just before making a coffee?

Coffee loses its aroma very quickly once it is ground. I personally would not grind coffee unless I am supposed to use it immediately... There are decent hand grinders available if you don't want to invest in a big, expensive equipment. Hand grinders may not be as good as electric ones, but I think it is better to hand grind your beans each time than to use pre-ground coffees.

Offline JP

  • Posts: 354
  • Location: Indianapolis, IN ander, our true elevated elder.
Re: COFFEE THREAD
« Reply #256 on: Sun, 10 May 2020, 23:36:42 »
Coffee loses its aroma very quickly once it is ground. I personally would not grind coffee unless I am supposed to use it immediately... There are decent hand grinders available if you don't want to invest in a big, expensive equipment. Hand grinders may not be as good as electric ones, but I think it is better to hand grind your beans each time than to use pre-ground coffees.

Man, no way I'd would grind by hand unless I was camping or something. I think I paid about $50 for my Cuisinart burr grinder so there are definitely good options out there without breaking the bank. Depending on local availability I will pick up pre-ground if I can't find the locally roasted primo stuff. I don't have any complaints about pre-ground other than the how course the grind might be. I think the main thing is keeping it sealed as best you can and of course drinking the stuff so you finish the bag in a timely manner.
About Me | The Collection
Therapy is expensive so I buy keyboards and bike parts.

Offline sugar.tea.milk

  • Posts: 8
Re: COFFEE THREAD
« Reply #257 on: Mon, 11 May 2020, 00:50:31 »
Coffee loses its aroma very quickly once it is ground. I personally would not grind coffee unless I am supposed to use it immediately... There are decent hand grinders available if you don't want to invest in a big, expensive equipment. Hand grinders may not be as good as electric ones, but I think it is better to hand grind your beans each time than to use pre-ground coffees.

Man, no way I'd would grind by hand unless I was camping or something. I think I paid about $50 for my Cuisinart burr grinder so there are definitely good options out there without breaking the bank. Depending on local availability I will pick up pre-ground if I can't find the locally roasted primo stuff. I don't have any complaints about pre-ground other than the how course the grind might be. I think the main thing is keeping it sealed as best you can and of course drinking the stuff so you finish the bag in a timely manner.

$50 is quite affordable indeed! I got my hand grinder few years ago for its portability and never looked into upgrading it since I rarely grind more than 20g at a time.  ^-^

Offline IronCheeks

  • Posts: 40
  • Location: NYC
Re: COFFEE THREAD
« Reply #258 on: Mon, 11 May 2020, 05:26:07 »
Coffee loses its aroma very quickly once it is ground. I personally would not grind coffee unless I am supposed to use it immediately... There are decent hand grinders available if you don't want to invest in a big, expensive equipment. Hand grinders may not be as good as electric ones, but I think it is better to hand grind your beans each time than to use pre-ground coffees.

Man, no way I'd would grind by hand unless I was camping or something. I think I paid about $50 for my Cuisinart burr grinder so there are definitely good options out there without breaking the bank. Depending on local availability I will pick up pre-ground if I can't find the locally roasted primo stuff. I don't have any complaints about pre-ground other than the how course the grind might be. I think the main thing is keeping it sealed as best you can and of course drinking the stuff so you finish the bag in a timely manner.

$50 is quite affordable indeed! I got my hand grinder few years ago for its portability and never looked into upgrading it since I rarely grind more than 20g at a time.  ^-^

What hand grinder do you use? I always hear about the Hario Skerton and the Hario Mini Mill being the top choices.



Offline sugar.tea.milk

  • Posts: 8
Re: COFFEE THREAD
« Reply #259 on: Tue, 12 May 2020, 23:44:12 »
What hand grinder do you use? I always hear about the Hario Skerton and the Hario Mini Mill being the top choices.

I have a Porlex Mini and a Handground coffee grinder, which are both quite outdated with lots of better options nowadays.  ^-^
Porlex mini is made with stainless steel, and I liked the fact that I could just throw it in my luggage and not worry about it.
I am not sure if Handground is still available, but it is much better than Porlex Mini in terms of grind consistency.
However, it is definitely not for carrying around considering its size.

Offline IronCheeks

  • Posts: 40
  • Location: NYC
Re: COFFEE THREAD
« Reply #260 on: Wed, 13 May 2020, 03:20:18 »
What hand grinder do you use? I always hear about the Hario Skerton and the Hario Mini Mill being the top choices.

I have a Porlex Mini and a Handground coffee grinder, which are both quite outdated with lots of better options nowadays.  ^-^
Porlex mini is made with stainless steel, and I liked the fact that I could just throw it in my luggage and not worry about it.
I am not sure if Handground is still available, but it is much better than Porlex Mini in terms of grind consistency.
However, it is definitely not for carrying around considering its size.

Porlex is definitely a great, quality option for a hand grinder. I was thinking about getting one for when I go camping/glamping. Could always use something handy like that.



Offline IronCheeks

  • Posts: 40
  • Location: NYC
Re: COFFEE THREAD
« Reply #261 on: Wed, 13 May 2020, 04:10:10 »
There's been a fair amount of talk regarding how people brew coffee, how people like their coffee prepared, what people put into their coffee, but I am left curious:

How do you like your coffee roasted?

I'm talking like, do you like a lighter roast, darker roast? Medium roast? French/Italian.

And for my enthusiasts out there, if you care to join, blend or single origin? If origin, where?

I'd love to hear everyone's take on this. Second to the threads about groupbuys and ICs - this has become my favorite thread so far as a hobbyist.



Offline noisyturtle

  • * Exalted Elder
  • Posts: 5961
  • comfortably numb
Re: COFFEE THREAD
« Reply #262 on: Wed, 13 May 2020, 04:40:21 »
I far prefer lighter roasts. Used to be the other way around, but there's so much more variance in lighter roasts. You can really taste where the bean came from (probably the most pretentious thing I'll write today)
I really like high altitude African and South American beans, they rarely let me down. Colombia and Ethiopia harvest good beans.

Offline sugar.tea.milk

  • Posts: 8
Re: COFFEE THREAD
« Reply #263 on: Wed, 13 May 2020, 06:38:13 »
I like beans in city to full city range, which I guess puts me in medium to medium dark range?
Ethiopian Yirgacheffe has been my favorite for the past few years.  :p
I don't have much experience with blends, so I am curious to see if there is any recommendation.

Offline IronCheeks

  • Posts: 40
  • Location: NYC
Re: COFFEE THREAD
« Reply #264 on: Wed, 13 May 2020, 21:50:13 »
I far prefer lighter roasts. Used to be the other way around, but there's so much more variance in lighter roasts. You can really taste where the bean came from (probably the most pretentious thing I'll write today)
I really like high altitude African and South American beans, they rarely let me down. Colombia and Ethiopia harvest good beans.

You're not pretentious in saying that you can taste where the beans came from - it's actually pretty spot-on. You can taste how the beans were washed and how the characteristics iconic to each region. Like, for instance, I tend to go toward low altitude African beans that have been naturally processed. They tend to be heavier on the fruity-tarty notes that give me a kick in the morning and have this fermented funk that borders on a wet wine cork.

I like beans in city to full city range, which I guess puts me in medium to medium dark range?
Ethiopian Yirgacheffe has been my favorite for the past few years.  :p
I don't have much experience with blends, so I am curious to see if there is any recommendation.

Yeah, I would say you like the darker roasts. You can't go wrong with Yirgacheffe. It's so balanced and just has a proper "coffee" flavor with a little bit of classic cherry. It's like the other Colombian on the block  :))



Offline fliz

  • Posts: 40
Re: COFFEE THREAD
« Reply #265 on: Fri, 22 May 2020, 20:55:11 »
I just got a Mypressi Twist and it is AMAZING. IMO it crushes the La Pavoni lever I previously had, despite that being customized to all hell.

My grinder is a Lyn Weber HG-1 and I love it, but, tragically, I have to sell it because I'm moving into my travel trailer full time and need something smaller. I'm looking at the Helor Flux as my replacement. I've only heard great things (except the price, of course)

I use a bellman stovetop steamer when I want to make milk drinks, and I've got my foaming technique down pretty good by now, but lately I've just been doing straight espresso because the Mypressi is so good at it.

As for the coffee, I've been roasting my own using a simple Nesco CR-1010. It's far from a technical roaster. Literally the only control I have is time, and in whole minute increments.

My most recent batch of beans have been a Yirg-Idido Ethiopian natural process that tastes like blueberries. So juicy, it's incredible. I'm struggling to limit myself to only one shot a day. Yesterday I had three. :D The third was at 10pm and over a scoop of ice cream. Affogatos will be the death of me.

Offline IronCheeks

  • Posts: 40
  • Location: NYC
Re: COFFEE THREAD
« Reply #266 on: Sun, 24 May 2020, 09:36:00 »

My most recent batch of beans have been a Yirg-Idido Ethiopian natural process that tastes like blueberries. So juicy, it's incredible. I'm struggling to limit myself to only one shot a day. Yesterday I had three. :D The third was at 10pm and over a scoop of ice cream. Affogatos will be the death of me.

I just had a bag of beans from a local roaster that had an Ethiopian with similar processing and taste as yours! Naturally processed coffees taste pretty amazing, but do take a little getting used to. My first time getting into those funky notes was through a Gesha Estate and that was a trip.

Also, affogatos are probably the best thing to have when the summer weather roles around. My best friend and I used to hunt down affogatos across the city to see which one was the best and most affordable.
Then again, gelato is gelato and we would gobble that stuff up.



Offline fliz

  • Posts: 40
Re: COFFEE THREAD
« Reply #267 on: Sun, 24 May 2020, 16:35:46 »
I remember the first time I had a pourover of some single estate natural processed from an upscale coffeeshop. I just stared at the cup with my mouth open, amazed that coffee could do what was happening.

Coffee is awesome. You can try some really high end stuff and develop an appreciation without breaking the bank like other high end drinks. Wine as good as this coffee would cost three figures per bottle, at least.

Offline IronCheeks

  • Posts: 40
  • Location: NYC
Re: COFFEE THREAD
« Reply #268 on: Wed, 27 May 2020, 13:24:57 »
I remember the first time I had a pourover of some single estate natural processed from an upscale coffeeshop. I just stared at the cup with my mouth open, amazed that coffee could do what was happening.

Coffee is awesome. You can try some really high end stuff and develop an appreciation without breaking the bank like other high end drinks. Wine as good as this coffee would cost three figures per bottle, at least.

Yeah. Coffee opened that door for me to be appreciative of good-tasting food and trying new things. Emphasis on good. Like, the quality doesn't even have to hit the subjective ceiling. It's probably one of the safer options, too, as a consumable hobby.

Wine and whiskey are alcoholic beverages; even though wine does have benefits of improving circulation and all the antioxidants it has, it's still going to affect your liver. Cigars, too! Some people have an affinity for different types of wrapper and where the tobacco is grown, but again, you are smoking.



Offline fliz

  • Posts: 40
Re: COFFEE THREAD
« Reply #269 on: Wed, 27 May 2020, 14:12:01 »
Fwiw, caffeine is, by far, the most abused drug on the planet. If it disappeared overnight, literally 70% of all living humans would experience withdrawal. Alcohol and tobacco are tied for #3. #2 are betel nuts, which I never even heard of until my professor told me this fact.

Offline noisyturtle

  • * Exalted Elder
  • Posts: 5961
  • comfortably numb
Re: COFFEE THREAD
« Reply #270 on: Mon, 06 July 2020, 18:54:47 »
this dude has an entire channel devoted to coffee tech:
https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCMb0O2CdPBNi-QqPk5T3gsQ/featured

Offline sugar.tea.milk

  • Posts: 8
Re: COFFEE THREAD
« Reply #271 on: Mon, 06 July 2020, 22:06:26 »
this dude has an entire channel devoted to coffee tech:
https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCMb0O2CdPBNi-QqPk5T3gsQ/featured

It's interesting to see how much thought one can put into a cup of coffee (even though it is not something I would do myself!).
I personally find his recipe videos quite helpful :-)

Offline WholesomeDucky

  • Posts: 36
  • Location: Eastern NC, USA
  • lemme get uhhhhhhhhhhhhh bread
Re: COFFEE THREAD
« Reply #272 on: Tue, 07 July 2020, 09:40:37 »
I just recently got a pour-over. I'm still trash at making a good cup with it, been practicing some in the afternoons.

How important is a scale? I don't have very refined tastebuds, so I'm kinda just working on consistency of technique and not experimenting too much.
7 years of spending money on typing

"Name checks out" -Kustoms, 2020

Discord:WholesomeDucky#9999
Inbox always open, for any reason.

Offline fliz

  • Posts: 40
Re: COFFEE THREAD
« Reply #273 on: Tue, 07 July 2020, 13:30:45 »
How important is a scale?

*very*

You can get one for pretty cheap on amazon or spend $200. Even the cheap one will make a huge difference in being able dial in your recipe and reproduce something consistently. You also may want to consider a pour-over kettle with a gooseneck spout. They're also cheap on amazon.

Offline sugar.tea.milk

  • Posts: 8
Re: COFFEE THREAD
« Reply #274 on: Wed, 08 July 2020, 21:46:26 »
How important is a scale?

*very*

You can get one for pretty cheap on amazon or spend $200. Even the cheap one will make a huge difference in being able dial in your recipe and reproduce something consistently. You also may want to consider a pour-over kettle with a gooseneck spout. They're also cheap on amazon.

Not sure if you already have these, but timer (to keep track of brewing time) and thermometer (to measure water temperature) might be helpful as well if you want to be consistent with your pour-over method. There are scales with built-in timer and pour-over kettles with built-in thermometer available if you do not wish to keep too many things around the kitchen, but I think buying tools with combined functions is usually more expensive..?

Offline tp4tissue

  • * Destiny Supporter
  • Posts: 12908
  • Location: Official Geekhack Public Defender..
  • OmniExpert of: Rice, Top-Ramen, Ergodox, n Females
Re: COFFEE THREAD
« Reply #275 on: Thu, 09 July 2020, 00:25:49 »
Very PRECISE Narcotics use behavior.

Offline fliz

  • Posts: 40
Re: COFFEE THREAD
« Reply #276 on: Thu, 09 July 2020, 15:56:38 »
Caffeine is the most abused substance on the planet. I think something like 70% of people would experience withdrawal if it disappeared overnight.

Offline noisyturtle

  • * Exalted Elder
  • Posts: 5961
  • comfortably numb
Re: COFFEE THREAD
« Reply #277 on: Thu, 09 July 2020, 16:55:47 »
More than alcohol or nicotine?


Offline noorejji

  • Posts: 175
  • Location: yurop
Re: COFFEE THREAD
« Reply #279 on: Thu, 09 July 2020, 21:31:00 »
Comparing caffeine reliance to narcotic substance abuse is ridiculous. Firstly, caffeine doesn't ruin lives. Secondly, it is arguable whether caffeine can be considered addictive to begin with (barring placebo). Not all diagnosis classifications include caffeine addiction, and for those that do its inclusion has been contested; and I'll bet that it has never been utilized in clinical practice - it would've been utterly flippant and a waste of time. If caffeine would disappear overnight people would experience mild symptoms like stress and jitteriness for one day or so, and then everything would go back to normal. If you for some reason have issues with coffee, you may switch to green tea (which contains theanine - similar to caffeine), or swap out every other cup of coffee with a cup of green tea.

Offline noorejji

  • Posts: 175
  • Location: yurop
Re: COFFEE THREAD
« Reply #280 on: Thu, 09 July 2020, 21:47:55 »
How important is a scale?

*very*

You can get one for pretty cheap on amazon or spend $200. Even the cheap one will make a huge difference in being able dial in your recipe and reproduce something consistently. You also may want to consider a pour-over kettle with a gooseneck spout. They're also cheap on amazon.
I second the importance of a scale/timer. It's the only way to follow recipes. I do recommend to get one that is built specifically for coffee. Juggling between a seperate timer and scale will be distracting and detriment to your technique and enjoyment.

I have both Acaia Lunar and Pearl, and have never regretted it. In fact I ended up replacing a Hario Drip Scale with a Pearl in a matter of days. The snappiness, precision, ease of use, and overall quality of Acaia just cannot be contested. That is not to say you must spend hundreds of dollars, but you simply must have a functional coffee scale. Nothing wrong with the Hario, I was just spoiled by the Lunar.

I would say the need for a thermometer is debatable however; personally I just boil water and start pouring right away. Having a proper goose neck kettle is way more important. James Hoffman has a good video on brewing temperatures. In espresso things are of course different.

Offline fliz

  • Posts: 40
Re: COFFEE THREAD
« Reply #281 on: Sun, 12 July 2020, 13:45:25 »
I'm tempted to get a pyxis...

Offline prognostics

  • Posts: 32
  • Location: USA - MI
Re: COFFEE THREAD
« Reply #282 on: Sun, 12 July 2020, 17:43:37 »
would anyone be interested in a group buy for mugs? was thinking something from https://deneenpottery.com with the geekhack logo or something?

In for 1 :thumb:

Offline noisyturtle

  • * Exalted Elder
  • Posts: 5961
  • comfortably numb
Re: COFFEE THREAD
« Reply #283 on: Sat, 17 October 2020, 17:05:11 »
In  reguards to using a French Press; what the heck do people mean when they say let the coffee 'bloom?' Everyone says let it bloom but I have no idea what that entails. Does it literally just mean getting the grounds wet? When does the bloom step happen?
You put in the grounds, pour in the water, then let it brew for 3 mins, push the plunger down, serve. Where is the bloom part?

Offline brln

  • Posts: 24
Re: COFFEE THREAD
« Reply #284 on: Sun, 18 October 2020, 15:31:17 »
Do you guys with a coffee machine actually try out a french press or mocha for fun? Sorry cant help with the blooming question.

Offline noisyturtle

  • * Exalted Elder
  • Posts: 5961
  • comfortably numb
Re: COFFEE THREAD
« Reply #285 on: Sun, 18 October 2020, 16:18:49 »
Yeah I got a French Press for free. Makes better coffee than my drip machine, but requires more effort.

Offline fohat.digs

  • * Elevated Elder
  • Posts: 5922
  • Location: 35°57'20"N, 83°52'50"W
  • weird funny old guy
Re: COFFEE THREAD
« Reply #286 on: Mon, 19 October 2020, 20:06:05 »
I have never understood coffee bloom, but the experts clearly feel that it is important.

https://www.roastycoffee.com/coffee-bloom/

One thing, though, is that coffee contains oils that make it more bitter. A metal mesh allows that oil through, as well as some of the finer sediment.

Paper filters absorb those oils, as well as holding back the sediments, so they create a significantly different result.
"If you're a moderate Democrat or a liberal who knows that your party has gone totally off the rails, you have a moral duty to immediately stop this lunacy. You must, by law, join the Republican Party."

- Donald Trump 2020-10-16 - Muskegon, Michigan, in a video on Fox TV

Offline noisyturtle

  • * Exalted Elder
  • Posts: 5961
  • comfortably numb
Re: COFFEE THREAD
« Reply #287 on: Mon, 19 October 2020, 20:12:33 »
They describe what bloom is but not what it looks like or how you know when it's happening. So it's always happening from the moment the beans are roasted and only for 10 days, is that what I am to understand? I'm starting to think it's one of those empty bull**** hipster terms that really doesn't mean anything at all, but instead is a good indicator of what kind of person you are talking about coffee with.

Offline fohat.digs

  • * Elevated Elder
  • Posts: 5922
  • Location: 35°57'20"N, 83°52'50"W
  • weird funny old guy
Re: COFFEE THREAD
« Reply #288 on: Mon, 19 October 2020, 20:17:44 »

what kind of person you are talking about coffee with.


Quite possible. I have several friends who insist on filtering the water and grinding the beans immediately before brewing, but I am too lazy.
"If you're a moderate Democrat or a liberal who knows that your party has gone totally off the rails, you have a moral duty to immediately stop this lunacy. You must, by law, join the Republican Party."

- Donald Trump 2020-10-16 - Muskegon, Michigan, in a video on Fox TV

Offline noisyturtle

  • * Exalted Elder
  • Posts: 5961
  • comfortably numb
Re: COFFEE THREAD
« Reply #289 on: Tue, 20 October 2020, 13:45:12 »
One thing, though, is that coffee contains oils that make it more bitter. A metal mesh allows that oil through, as well as some of the finer sediment.

Paper filters absorb those oils, as well as holding back the sediments, so they create a significantly different result.


Today I cut circular paper filters and inserted them between the mesh and plunger and immediately noticed an improvement in smoothness. All the great taste of the press and the smoothness of a filter  :thumb:

The first cup is great at any rate. The two issues for me are temperature and bitterness between my first cup and second (press holds 34oz, enough for 2.)
By the time I pour the second cup 30-40 mins later it's lukewarm and bitter.
« Last Edit: Tue, 20 October 2020, 14:07:17 by noisyturtle »

Offline pixelpusher

  • Posts: 3557
  • Location: Tennessee - USA
Re: COFFEE THREAD
« Reply #290 on: Tue, 20 October 2020, 15:25:19 »
I always pour the entire French press result into an insulated carafe and drink from that.

I also have found a method that I may or may not have come up with on my own.  It was a matter of trial and error.

I don't always use a French press, but when I do, I pour in stages.  First I pour the hot water over the slightly larger grind just enough to cover the grounds.  This way they sit, full strength in the water.  I agitate the beans a bit to release the flavor with a spoon.  Let that sit for about a minute or two.

Then I pour the rest of the water and stir for 10 seconds or so.  This usually results in a froth at the top.  Let that sit for another 2-3 min before a final slow stir and press.

Lastly, it goes into a thermos to keep it hot.  I don't do a lot of coffee research but I find this gives a more balanced cup than just pouring all the water over the grounds and watching them float to the top.  It might be even better to slowly stir the entire time, but I think that would cool down the water too much and I don't want to stand over my coffee for the entire process.
« Last Edit: Tue, 20 October 2020, 16:15:50 by pixelpusher »